Risk Prediction Initiative

The Selga Chronology
Part I: 1348-1900




This database has been built with the support of the RPI AWARD No. PRI02-2-009. "Japan Landfalling Typhoons".

The following table includes typhoons extracted from the Selga Chronology. Data included:

  • Year, Month and Day(s): date of occurrence
  • Summary and description: original text in the Selga Chronology
  • Type of Source: historical (h), instrumental (i), unknown (u)
    • Historical: at least one document is referenced in the main text
    • Instrumental: at least one instrumental observation is provided in the main text
    • Unknown: no reference nor instrumental observations are provided
  • Intensity: typhoon (t), storm (s) and depression (d)
    • The classification produced by M. Selga has been conserved

Underlined years are linked to an image with the approximate trajectory of the typhoon
(If you use this database please cite: R. García-Herrera, P. Ribera, E. Hernández, L. Gimeno:'Typhoons in the Philippine Islands 1566-1900'. Submitted to Journal of Climate.)
Miguel Selga

Days
Month
Year
Summary and description
Sources
Intensity

October
1566
The logbook of the ship San Jeronimo shows that in the month of October of 1566 she experienced several storms between Guam and the Philipines, on account of which she was forced to change her course several times
h
s
15
August
1568
If we take into consideration the topographical situation of the place and the season of the year it is very probable that the maritime disaster related below refers to a typhoon. "The nao Capitana commanded by Felipe de Salcedo left Cebu for Nueva España on the first of June, under very favorable weather, with one hundred and thirty persons, and with a great quantity of cinnamon. With much hardship she followed her course to the Ladrone Islands. On arriving at the island of Guam and entering the port, which is very unprotected, and after the landing of the General, Felipe de Salcedo and of the majority of the passengers of the ship on the feast of the Asuncion de Nuestra Señora on August 15, a heavy storm broke out that carried away the ship and dashed her against the coast, where she was smashed to pieces, with a total loss of all her cargo."
u
t
29
June
1589
A furious typhoon raged over Manila Bay destroying many vessels belonging to Spaniards and Chinese. The native said that no storm like this had ever before occurred. The sea and the river swelled to such height that the Fort was flooded.
u
t
3
October
1596
One Galleon, San Felipe, left Cavite for Acapulco on July 12, 1596. She met two typhoons in the Pacific in the month of September. While she was navigating close to Japan on the third day of October, at the hour of vespers, on the eve of St. Francis, another typhoon of five days duration came upon which forced the Galleon without masts and sails, towed by 200 funkas, to the dangerous shores of Chopongame, where she was stranded and filled with water up to the first deck.
u
t
18-25
September
1596
The people of the city of Manila were very much grieved at the loss of the galleon San Felipe which, diverted from its course by a series of tempests, fell into the hands of the enemies on the coast of Japan. So valuable was the cargo shipped on the boat that, as Governor Tello wrote to the King of Spain, its value would have been apraised in Mexico at more than one million three hundred thousand pesos. On July 12, 1596, the galleon San Felipe, 700 tons, left Cavite under the command of General D. Matias de Sandecho, taking on board 300 persons, among them even seven Fathers; four Agustinians, two Franciscans and one Dominican, who was the Chaplain of the boat. It anchored at Ticao and received the documents from Governor D. Francisco Tello. On the 18th of September, while in the latitude of Japan, a furious hurricane burst over the ship and drowned six men. The waves carried away the binnacle, steering gear and galley: tearing to pieces the helm main and sails. It was necessary to lighten the vessel, because the water entered by the hatchways. A second tempest struck them on the 25th, lasting 36 hours, and damaging the lower deck. It was aboard this galleon San Felipe at the time she was making the open sea through the Strait of San Bernardino, that the passengers observed the famous comet of 1596, the first of which there is any record of having been observed in the Philippines. Among the passengers of the lost galleon, there was a glorious martyr Fray Felipe de Jesus o de las Casas, Chaplain, who for a lack of a bishop in the Philippines was sent by his superiors to his native country to by ordained, but was put to death on the hillock of Nagasaki together with othe companions of the same Institute for the profession of his faith.
u
s
4
October
1598
D. Luis Perez das Mariñas, former Governor of the Philippines, loyal server of God and of his king, organized at his private expense an expedition to China to assist the king of Cambodia. The hurricane experienced by the vessels of the expedition is thus described by one of the passengers, Fr. Diego Aduarte, O.P. "We left Manila Bay on the 17th of September; we were about one hundred and fifty soldiers and sailors. The sixth day of the trip had not elapsed before our ships were dispersed by a furious hurricane. The Galeota came out the best, because, although destroyed, at least she landed on friendly shores. The Capitana, after many mishaps, finally ran aground on the coast of China, on the eve of St. Franceis. The flagship, on board of which I was a passenger, lost the main mast. The helm was broken by the fury of the wind and of the sea... The planks of the vessel played like the keys of an organ... All the efforts done to repair the weak parts of the boat against the mountainous seas and the strong winds were like the attemp of a child to check the fury of a brave bull. We remained several days in such a distressed condition and with the fear that something worse was yet to come upon us, because the day of our father St. Frances was drawing near and it is infallible that on that day, or two or three days before or after it, these seas are disturbed by storms. With these fears, we were determined to take shelter, in the Babuyan Islands. We got our ship so near to shore, that the bow touched the land and we dropped two anchors by the stern. Suspicious of the weather, we landed the provisions and supplies that we had taken along with us. We began unloading our supplies, as the eve of St. Francis was approaching. Before we could get them all, there was again a strong storm. The vessel was shattered to pieces some of which reached the land but the keel and artillery were buried in the sand, the ship being unable to support their weight. For two days we weathered this fierce storm of high winds and heavy rains, under the shelter of a few cottages made by us along the seashore with some trunks." It was a singular providence of God that the survivors escaped alive from a tempest so fierce and in a seashore so deserted and abandoned. When the storm abated, a small boat was made with the spare parts of the wrecked vessel. On it Fr. Diego made his way to Northern Luzon to give an account of the accident and to beg assistance from Manila
h
t
27
October
1599
In October of 1599, the fervent missionary Fr. Diego Garcia, S.J., in company with eight other Jesuits, was returning from Manila to his missions of the Visayas. The navigation to the Visayas was such as is to be anticipated in the month of October, which is always stormy. "Up to the 21st of October, writes the historian Fr. Chirino, the weather was good, but on this day the Fathers encountered a storm which, although not very strong, drove the vessels to a bank covered with corals and rocks, so dangerous that the ships were almost broken to pieces. On the 23rd of the same month, there came another storm stronger than the former. On account of the force of the wind, the vessels were dispersed. The ship on which Fr. Visitor was travelling with other five missionaries was carried by the waves towards Marinduque. At last they entered a river and had some shelter from the boisterous weather. The next day, which was fair, as it happens ordinarily after a storm, the ships sailed around Bondoc point, and anchored near the shore. Four days afterwards a strong wind broke out again and obliged the missionaries to enter again a small river for protection against the storm, or baguio, which lasted that day and the next, dedicated to St. Simon and Judas.
u
s
1
May
1601
The ship Santo Tomas set sail from port of Acapulco on February 16, 1601 and sighted the Pilippines 72 days later, on April 29. Having missed the San Bernardino Strait, the Santo Tomas was carried by the currents towards Catanduanes. While lying of anchor in a bay, a hurricane so violent came on, that it tore the ship away from its moornings.
u
t
21-23
August
1602
Towards the end of July 1602 there headed out through the Strait of Mariveles en route to New Spain, the ship San Antonio, the Captain's ship El Espiritu Santo, and the admiral's ship called Jesus María. Only the ship San Antonio completed its journey, for the other two had to return to Cavite much damaged by storms. In particular the ship El Espiritu Santo met with a violent baguio on the Pacific to the south of Japan. In a report of the journey and storm written on the coast of Ilocos by Pedro de Anciondo, November 2, 1602, he says: "When in the position of the 25th parallel, we met with a storm which obliged us to lighten the ship of everything on top of deck, and of 300 boxes and bales from below deck. This storm lasted from the 21st of August to the 23rd, on which day we were in the position of the parallel 28.5º. Our sails were destroyed, we cut down the main mast and we found about 20 palms of water above the step of the mast." After many troubles the ship reached Japan, but she had to leave there on account of the poor reception given her there by the natives. With difficulty she returned to Cavite on November 18, 1602, with 300 pieces missing.
u
t
11
July
1603
When two ships, loaded with produce, were near Mariveles, they encountered such a violent hurricane that they were forced to cast anchor there.
u
t
20
August
1606
On July 22, 1606, a Spanish ship left Cavite en route to Japan. It was August 20th when they reached the 20th parallel. There they had a fierce storm in which it was necessary to unstep the topmast and to lower and take in all the sails. Such was the fury of the wind and the violence of the waves that the tiller was broken and the ship was left in such a great distress that it was necessary to lighten it of everything it had on deck. The storm grew worse on St. Bartholomew's day and the night came on very cloudy and dark with hurricane winds and terrific thunder. About 10 o'clock at night the wind increased in such a way that the ship was heeled over until the sails touched the water, and the side of the boat was submerged for a space of three creeds. In such distress the officials and sailors had recourse to the help of Heaven, and the Captain promised a lamp of 150 pesos to our Lady of Rosary in Manila, and another to the Virgin of the Rosary in Quato, a town in Japan from which the ship was not far distant. God was pleased to hear the prayers of His servants and a little while afterwards the ship entered the port of Fucajari, but two leagues below Nagasaki
u
t

OctoberandNovember
1608
From the Edifying Letters of the Jesuit Missionaries, we know that in October and November of 1608, there were several formidable hurricanes in the Philippine Archipelago.
h
s
1
November
1610
The Annual Litterare of the Province of the Philippines, signed by Fr. Gregorio Lpez, mention a storm that caused considerable destruction in the mountains of Cavite. Speaking of the town of Sii and, Fr. Lopez says: " The jubilee was published in this storm, on Sunday, the eve of all Saints. On that night, when the enthusiasm of the people for gaining of the jubilee was at its climax, the devil jealous of the good to be expected from the jubilee, excited a terrible tempest of furious wind, a hurricane or baguio, as it is called in these islands, so strong that it destroyed more than 200 houses and caused injury to the rest. The greatest risk lay in the fact that many flanks of the chuch were carried away by the wind to a considerable distance, to the great danger of the fathers who were compelled to seek shelter in the sacristy, which was more secluded and better protected. The night was spent in great anxiety and suffering because of the shakig of the church due to the pressure of the high winds"
h
t
10-15
October
1617
A very severe typhoon crossed Visayas. Six ships were wrecked near Marinduque with the loss of over a thousand persons. It was considered as the greatest calamity during the administration of Jeronimo de Silva
u
t
2
August
1620
A violent typhoon raged over Samar. The ship San Nicolas, that was returning from Acapulco to Manila, was wrecked near Borongan. The flagship of the expedition foundered near Palapag.
u
t
24
May
1621
A strong typhoon between San Bernardino Strait and Manila. The six hundred passengers of the frigate Buen Jesus were in danger of shipwreck.
u
t
17
January
1629
Strong typhoon that did considerable damage in the Island of Marinduque.
u
t

August
1629
The Governor of the Philippines reports to the home office that the ships dispatched on August 1st from Manila to Acapulco had encountered a severe typhoon in the Pacific and having been lashed by eleven more hurricanes the vessels were forced to put back and to return to the Philippines after seven months of useless efforts to cross the Pacific and reach Acapulco
u
t

January
1630
Toward the beggining of January a strong typhoon, lasting 24 hours, was felt over southern Samar.
u
t
10
November
1638
A document entitled Sucesos de Filipinas, probably written by Juan López, S.J., gives in the form of a diary the main events in the Phillippines during the period 1638-1639. The sucesos give an account of a furious storm that raged over Manila Bay and out in the China Sea on November, 1638, with great danger to navigation. " At midnight on November 10, so fierce a gale of wind came from the south that it broke five of the moorings of the flagship San Luis, which was about to sail to Ternate, having been already laden with artillery aboard. The wind carried away its shrouds, and grounded it in the sands near Parañeque, but in a way that it could be floated off after five days. The wind also drove the second galley ashore, but without doing any damage. At dawn on the morning of the eleventh, the ship from India which was the last to go to Macan, anchored in the bay. It lost most of its masts by the fierceness of the storm, and others were disabled. The storm struck them after they had already anchored. Had it struck them outside, all think that no one would have escaped, to judge from the way in which the ship was disabled. News arrived on the night of November 20 that the secondpatache, which was going to Oton to get a cargo of rice for Ternate, was driven ashore some leagues from here by the galeof wind above mentioned, but all the crew were saved"
h
t
20
September
1638
The flagship Ntra. Sra. De la Concepcion was caught by a baguio in the Pacific on her way from Manila to Acapulco, and wrecked with a total loss of cargo and death of almost all passengers near the island of Rota, Mariana Islands. The Sucesos en Filipinas describes the arrival of a few survivors at Manila ten months later, and gives details of the horrors of the disaster. "In the afternoon of July 24, six of the men who had sailed in the flagship of the last year, which was wrecked september 20, 1638, by the fury of a tempest in the Ladrone Islands-on an island thirty-five leguas away from the islands where our ships generally land on the voyage- arrived here. Besides those who were drowned, many were killed by lance thrusts from the natives. Those who scaped went from island to island to those of Uan and Harpana, where they have been well treated. The reason alleged for that was, that the Spaniards are good men, and leave them iron when they pass there. From the island of Uan the natives dispatched siz Spaniards and two Indians in two boats furnishing them with food from what they had. They commended themselves to God, crossed the open stretch of more than three hundred leguas, which they did in but one fortnight-a wonderfuk thing if one will but consider those small boats which are of much less burden and steadiness that pirogues and canoes, and even smaller than they. They arrived almost dead with hunger, thirst and lack of sleep. Our fathers of the Society of Jesus received them in Palapag, and cared for them for several days; aftar that they recovered, and inmediately set out in a champan with a good supply of food. The Indians of Uan sent those Spaniards, so that they could give the news and send a boat for the other twenty-two Spaniards who are there alive, with some Indians and Negroes, and carry them iron, etc". As soon as the tidings were told in this port of Cavite, the sobs and cries were so many that all were stunned, for there is no one who has not lost a son, a father, a brother, a brother in law, a father in law, a son in law, or a husband. The loss has been one of the greatest that has ever visited this islands, because of the loss of men and the poverty of the islands. Diaz states that the galleon Ntra. Sra. De la Concepcion was the largest one built up to that time, and that it contained the greatest wealth of the islands. The few men who escaped to land were afterwards rescued by Spanish ships, and taken back to Manila-save one, a Chinesse blacksmith, who spent the rest of his life there and acquired great influence over the natives
h
t
27
June
1639
A destructive hurricane raged furiously over Manila Bay. It did great damaged to the city. The typhoon blew down one hundred and seventy houses in Parañaque.
u
t
5
August
1639
A very strong typhoon raged over the China Sea and the western coast of Luzon. Out of five ships that had left Manila for Acapulco, two of them foundered near Cavite with the loss of 600 Chinese. Two ships coming from Acapulco to Manila were wrecked in the coast of Vigan, with the loss pf 150 persons. The material losses amounted to more than half a million pesos
u
t
5
October
1649
The nao Nuestra Señora de la Encarnacion was overtaken by a typhoon in the San Bernardino Strait and totally broken up in the shores of Bulan, with the loss of over two hundred persons. Ten Champans were wrecked during the same typhoon.
u
t
29
May
1654
A strong typhoon between San Bernardino Strait and Manila. It wrecked the Galleon on which the missionary Juan Montiel, S.J., was coming from Mexico to the Philippines. The storm lasted 15 days and caused unbelievable sufferings to the survivors.
u
t
25
November
1659
The following quotation, although not explicitly using the word baguio or typhoon, makes it clear, however, that it refers to a hurricane which crossed the island of Marinduque on November 25, 1659, judging from theperiod of the year, the region and the phrase, "furious tempest". This quotation is taken from the History of the Philippines by Rev, Pedro Murillo, who states that: "On the 25th of November, 1659, Rev. Juan del Castillo, a native of Manila, was drowned in the Tablazo of Marinduque, during a furious tempest. His entrance in the Society of Jesus was of great edification to all, because of the high qualifications that he possessed and the positions of trust he had held, namely 'Encomendero', 'Regidor', 'Capitan' and 'Procurator' of the City of Manila. Having been sent to Visayas, the small vessel was wrecked and he lost his life whiles he was the confessions of the fellow passengers and encouraging them all up to the last moment. Only three natives escaped with their lives to tell the doleful tale"
h
t
15
July
1659
Francisco Ferrer, sailed for Manila on a sampan and, having passed the coast of Lobo, was lashed by a furious storm. All the passengers and crew died.
u
t
18
October
1659
A severe typhoon raged over Visayas. The boat on which the Jesuit missionary Jose Quesada was travelling to Manila was caught by the typhoon and sunk near Burias. With the exception of three persons, all passengers were drowned
u
t
3
July
1686
Willian Damper wrote: the 4th day of July we got into a deep Bay, four leagues from the islands of Sarangani and Balut. But the night before, in a violent tornado, our bark being unable to beat any longer. Besides, we were forced to shelter ourselves from the violence of the weather, which was so boisterous with rains, and tornadoes, and strong westerly wind.
h
t
26
September
1687
The great English privater, Dampier, "coplying with the inclination I had very early on seeing the world" went on a summer voyage to Newfoundland, but was so pinched by the vigour of the climate, that he determined never to go to that part of the world again. His future ambition was the pirate trade in the tropics. Dampier joined the Cygnet of London under Captain Swan and welcomed the opportunity to cross the Pacific, take the Spanish route to the Philippines and "cruise off Manila". While reconnoitering the Bashi Channel, north of Luzon, "we were surprised on September 25th, with a most violent tempest which forced us out to the sea and we were every moment in danger of being swallowed up by the waves till the 29th, when the fury of the winds being allayed, we made the best of our way back to the island. The last storm so dishearted our men that all resolved to lay aside their design of cruising before Manila". Of the typhoon itself Dampier has the following to say. "About the 24th day of September, the winds shifted about to the east, and from thence to the NE fine weather. The 25th it came at N and began to grow fresh, and the sky began to be clouded; and the wind freshened on us. At 12 o'clock at night it blew a very fierce storm. We were then riding with our best bower a head and though our yards and top mast were down, yet we drove. This obligued us to let go our sheet anchor, veering out a good scope of cable which stopt us till 10 or 11 o'clock the next day. Then the wind came on so fierce, that we drove again, with both anchors ahead. The wind was now at N by W and we kept driving till 3 or 4 o'clok in the afternoon; and it was well for us that there were no islands, rocks or sands in our way, for if there had, we must have been driven upon them. We used our utmost endeavours to stop here, being loath to go to sea, because we had six of our men ashore, we could not get off now. At last we were driven off into deep water, and then it was in vain to wait any longer... We had very violent weather the night ensuing, with very hard rain, and we were forced to scud with our bare poles till 3 o'clock in the morning. Then the wind slackened, and we brought our ship to, under a mizzen, and lay with our head to the westward. The 27th day the wind abated much, but it rained very hard all day, and the night ensuing. The 28th day the wind came about to the NE and it cleared up, and blew a hard gale, but it stood not there, for it shifted about to the eastward, thence to the SE then to the S, and at last settled at SW and then we had a moderate gale and fair weather... This last storm put our men quite out of heart; for altho it was not altogether so fierce as that which we were in on the Coast of China, which was still fresh in memory, yet it wrought more powerfully, and frighted them from their design of cruising before Manila, fearing another storm there."
h
t
3
July
1694
The Galleon San José ran aground on the island of Luban in a furious typhoon. It was shattered to pieces, resulting in the total loss of its cargo and the death of more than 400 persons.
u
t
Unknown
November
1697
With the aim of discovering the Palau Islands, a schooner was built and equipped in Manila through the contributions of several persons. On it embarked Jaime Javier, a Dutch Jesuit, well versed in nautical lines. About November, the schooner reached Balangiguan and Javier landed, as if urged by Providence. For on that night a terrible stone arose which broke the cable of the vessel, took it away from its port, and lashed it whith such strength that it miserably sank with all hands on board. Brother Jaime Javier had instructions to go to Guiuan, to meet Fr. Francisco Prado, in order to start from there together for the discovery of Palau Islands. This father had already prepared for this purpose a big vessel named Sacayan by the native of Visayas
u
s
30
July
1704
Terrible storm on the eve of Saint Ignatious. It was a baguio on account of the force of the wind and the waves
u
t

September
1707
On this baguio, Murillo gives the following information: "On September, 1707, the Capitana was lashed by storms so furious that it was considered a singular favor for any vessel no to sink in the gulf. The hull of the vessel was almost shattered to pieces owing to the force of the waves. It was very lucky for a ship in such a miserable state to be able to reach these islands. Finally the port os Sorsogon was reached and from there the Fathers journeyed by land to Manila with less danger, but no greater confort."
u
t
23
August
1708
A typhoon raged over the China Sea about the middle of August 1708. We are told that the ship N.S. Das Neves coming from Goa entered the port of Macao on the 23rd of August shattered by a typhoon
u
t
Unknown
May
1709
The Governor of the Philippines, Zabalburú, prepared a good and well-equipped vessel for the discovery of the Palau Islands. In the sea of Marinduque, they were caught by a severe baguio. Brother Agnaron, who ewas trying to make Boac in a small junk to get fresh supplies, was forced by winds and waves to part from the main vessel but managed to keep afloat by attaching bamboo rafts to the sides of the junk and finally drifted into the port of Romblon, where the main vessel was safely sheltered.
u
s
unknown
July
1709
The expedition sent out by the Governor of the Philippines to discover the Palau Islands encountered a severe typhoon in the Pacific.
u
t

June
1709
The expedition send from Manila to discover and explore Palau Islands met four typhoons in the Pacific between Samar and the Palau group.
u
t
18
October
1711
This baguio must have occurred on October 18, because according to Murillo, Father Andres Serrano went to his reward on October 18, 1711
u
s
unknown
July
1717
It was the fiercest typhoon ever experienced in these islands and hardly a house remained undestroyed however strong it was.
u
t
22
August
1720
We know the existence of this baguio from a letter written by Father Juan Antonio Cantova who experienced it. The letter dated the 1st of January, 1721, in Agaña, Island of Guam, was sent to Father Pedro Murillo Velarde, who published it in his Historia. The part of the letter which refers to the baguio says: "On the 18th of August of last year, we entered the Pacific Ocean through San Bernardino and on the 22nd of the same month, we were caught by a storm so furious that we were forced to lihghten the ship and cut the masts. Afterwards we met two other typhoons which forced us to change our course and navigate up to the parallel of 23 degrees."
h
t
23
July
1726
The Galleon Santo Cristo de Burgos was on her way to Acapulco when it was overtaken by a furious baguio and driven by the winds and waves on the rocks Ticao Island.
u
t
11-12
December
1734
A hurricane which blew down almost all the houses of the town, prevented the peoples from attending the midnight mass, and destroyed the crops of palay and other cereals.
h, p
t
5
September
1738
From the morning of the 5th to the morning of the 6th, Macao experienced a dreadful typhoon which did enormous damage and caused tremendous waves of the sea. No similar typhoon was remembered to have struck the colony since its foundation. The loss of ships and Chinesse champans were appaling.
u
t
1
November
1742
In a manuscript dated 1743 and written in Manila, we read the following account: "On All Saints' Day of the last year, 1742, we experienced such a storm, as never before had been seen in Manila. It caused the greatest destruction to the churches and houses of the Society os Jesus. In our church, some arches were damaged. The big window of the choir with its frame was forced in ; the rain rushed in and the church was so full of water, that mass could not be saidon some of the altars the next day. The corridors of many houses were destroyed, and in a word, there is scarcely a roof in Manila that is not damaged
h
t
23
September
1742
The relations between Spain and Great Britain being unfriendly in 1739, it was decided to send to the South-Seas a squadron commanded by Anson to crush upon the Spanish commerce and destroy their settlements. The destruction of the trade of the Philippine Islands with Acapulco and the capture of Manila were an important part of the program. The city of Manila and the island on which it stands was considered of great importance because of the healthiness of its air, the excellence of its port and bay, and the number and wealth of its inhabitants, and the very extensive and beneficial commerce which it carries to the principal parts of the East Indias and China, and its extensive trade to Acapulco the return for which being made in silver are upon the lowest valuation, not less than three millions of dollars per annum. Late in August, 1742, the Centurion arrived at Tinian, Mariana Islands. Many of the marines being sick with scurvy were removed to the shore. The narrative of the storm that occurred while many patients were still ashore is as follows: "By the middle of Sptember many of the sick had tolerably recovered and were sent on board the ship; the Commodore who was himself ill of the scurvy, had a tent erected for him on shore, where he stayed several days. Under these abnormal conditions, the wind on the 22nd, blew from the eastward with such a fury that we soon despaired of riding out the storm; all the communication with the shore was now effectually cut off, for there was no possibility that a boat could live, so that we were necessitated to ride it out, till our cables parted. Indeed it was not long before this happened, for the small bower parted at five in the afternoon and the ship swung off to the best bower and as the night came on, the violence of the wind still increased; but notwithstanding its inexpressible fury, the tide ran with much rapidity as to prevail over it... The sea broke most surprisingly all around us and a large tumbling swell threatened to poop us... In this pressing danger the commanding officer ordered several guns to be fired and light to be shown, as a signal to the Commodore of our distress, and in a short time after, it being then about one o'clock, and the night excessively dark, a strong gust, attended with rain and lighting drove us off the bank and forced us out to the sea, leaving behind us, on the island, Mr Anson, with many more of our officers and great part of the crew, amounting in the whole to one hundred and thirteen persons. Thus we were all, both at sea and on shore, reduced to the utmost despair, by this catastrophe, those on shore conceiving they have no means left them ecer to leave the island, and we on board utterly unprepared to struggle with the fury of the seas and winds we were now esposed to and expecting each moment to be our last. On account of the roar of the sea, the firing of the guns was not heard from the shore and the frequent glare of the lightning prevented the explosions from being observed. At daybreak the crew on the shore concluded with the utmost consternation that the ship had been lost or if safe, they had scarsely any expectation that she would ever be able to make the island again for the wind continued to blow strong at east, and they know how poorly she was manned and provided for struggling with so tempestuous a gale. The turbulent weather which forced us from Tinian did not begin to abate till three days after, and then we swayed up the foreyard abd began to heave up tha mainyard but the jars broke and killed one of our men. Five days after our departure and with inmense labor we secured our anchor. After flying to the eastward for several days, the ship returned to the island and on the 11 of October being the nineteenth day from the departure the ship arrived in the offing at Tinian. On the evening of the same day we, to our inexpressible joy, came to an anchor in the road thereby procuring to our shipmates on shore as well as to ourselves a cessation from the fatigues and the apprenhensions which this disastrous incident had given rise to." On June 20, 1742, this same centurion engaged and took the Spanish galleon Nuestra Señora de Covadonga off Cape Espiritu Santo, Samar, with a valuable cargo of 1313843 pieces of eight and 35682 oz of virgin silver, valued at 400000 pounds sterling.
u
t
4
December
1748
In a horrible baguio, a wave carried away P.Ignacio Generoso Serra with four other Fathers who probably were eaten by the sea monsters, because only one corpse was found of the many passengers who perished
h, s
t

December
1752
On the 12th of December, 1752, christian burial was given in the church of our Father, S. Francisco, to Luis de Villanueva, young man who died suddenly, his house having toppled over him on account of the baguio and thus preventing him from receiving the last sacraments
h, p
t
19
May
1753
With the aim of fostering the political and commercial relations between the kingdom of Siam and the goverment of Philippines, it was arranged with common consent to stablish in Siam a dock-yard in wich the galeon Ntra.Sra. de Guadalupe was buit. When the galeon was navigating from Siam to Manila, to undertake later on the voyage to Acapulco, the ship was caught, on the 19th of may, by a storng typhoon in latitude 13º 40', and a distance of 30º from Lubang. The high winds lasted for three days and backed from N through W to S.
u
t
24
June
1753
A very strong typhoon in Siquijor, Cebu and Southern Negros.
u
t
3-4
December
1754
'On the 3rd and 4th a formidable baguio occurred and since then the eruption of the volcano (Taal) ceased'. 'On the 2nd, a very furious baguio burst forth with considerable quantity of mud and ashes. It was so destructive that not even a tree or grass was left alive. On the 3rd, the storm blew with greater fury and the amount of mud was such that there was no corner left in the house where one might seek shelter and refuge.'
h, p
t
29
December
1757
'The typhoon burst forth and the galley was wrecked in an attemp to round the cape....Captain Fernando Torres and 35 men perished likewise: 15 men were saved floating on the débris of the shipwreck. After the storm abated, part of the artillery and other ammunitions were saved'
h
t
30
September
1762
While the British were sieging the city of Manila, a strong typhoon broke over Manila Bay. Admiral Cornish reported that "the siege, though short, was attended with many difficultuies. We had constantly fresh gales, a lee shore, and consequently a high surf, to contend with which made it always difficult, frequently hazardous, and sometimes impossible, to land with boats. The rains fell very heavy. The gale drove the Southsea Castle ashore near Polvorista."
u
t
8
December
1766
'On the night of the 8th to the 9th of December, 1776, a terrible strom destroyed in Manila many houses of the natives, an English boat that was anchored in Manila Bay was badly damged and a boat of the ship Buen Consejo was sunk. The winds backed from northnortheast to southwest through the north'
h, p
t
23
October
1766
By a letter of the Governor of the province of Albay to the fiscal of Manila, we learn of a very strong baguio which raged in the towns of Albay and Camarines at the end of October, 1766. We have been unable to find the Spanish text of the letter and we cannot do more than to give in English the French translation that Le Gentil made from the original Spanish account. Le Gentil happened to be in Manila preparing for the transit of Venus which was to take place on June 4, 1769. "In the year 1766, on the 23rd of October at dawn, a strong west wind began to blow. At 8 o'clock it grew stronger and continued to blow with the same force until 4 o'clock. It drizzled at intervals. In the upper part of the atmosphere, the wind was coming from the East while in the lower a steady west wind was blowing with constant force until 7 o'clock when it doubled its velocity and veered to WNW. With this direction, it acquired such strength that it seemed it was going to destroy everything. I thought that the town was going to be completely carried away. With this strength it lasted until 3 in the morning when it changed suddenly and violently to the S, destroying all the houses of the town which had been badly shaken before. The rain then decreased a little. At 2 a.m. the Mayon volcano started to vomit out more water than it was possible to calculate. I never saw such a thing before, and only with the data which I am giving, some idea may be formed of what happened. Between Libog and Albay various rivers 20 yards wide were formed, rushing into the sea, consederably swollen and with great violence. This rivers cannot be waded now when during high tide; before there were only three rivers and some brooks which could easily be waded at any hour. From Bacacay to Malinao, the width of the rivers is over 80 yards; from Camalig advancing through the interior of Jayares of the province of Naga the land has changed so much that the roads cannot be recongnized. The town of Malinao has been completely destroyed; almost all the houses ruined; the weeds and fields enterely covered with piles of sand. One-third of the town of Cagsava has also been destroyed. The other two thirds are forming an island or rather a mountain surrounded by wide and step gorges through which currents of water and sand had passed. This inundation has cost even more ruin in Camalig, Guinobatan, Ligao and Polangui. It reached the town of Albay accross the devasted farms, carrying away with it 50 houses which were at the foot of the volcano. In the southwest the coconut trees, palms and others had been covered with sand up to the top of the trees. The houses that had withstood the storm, remained half covered with sand and the persons that stayed in those houses escaped death. Those that went out to run away from the inminent danger perished without exception in the sand. In Albay, 18 corpses of both sexes were found; over 30 in Malinao; many were saved somehow or other. A boy of two years was found buried in the sand, and only his head could be seen with his right arm covering his eyes. Nothing is known about his mother. This torrent or inundation had covered a space of almost two leagues. Such an amount of destruction could not possibly be owing only to the amount of water that had fallen that day, for the rains had not been excesive. By all appearances this terrible amount of water came out from the crater of the volcano. Now the volcano is in the same state as before the occurrence. The sand makes it inaccessible and prevents a close examination."
h
s
23
October
1767
The following typhoon was reported by the french astronomer Le Gentil who happened to be in Manila. In October 22, there was felt in Manila a typhoon which although not shifting around all points of the compass, but only from NW to SW through W, yet caused considerable damage in Manila and its neighborhood. The districts of Manila were inundated as a result of an enormous quantity of rain and simultaneous high tides. In the town of San Mateo alone more than 500 persons perished as a result of the hurricane and the heavy floods of the San Mateo river
h
t
2
October
1768
A very severe typhoon raged over the Pacific. The ship bringing the exile Jesuits from Manila to Acapulco, was overtaken and buffeted by the storm
u
t
8-10 and 29
September
1768
On February 27, 1767, Charles the Third decreed the expulsion of the Jesuits from all the dominions of his vast empire. Manuel Galban, Auditor of the Royal Audiencia of Manila was subdelegated by the Governor to carry out the execution of the royal ordinance. It was resolved that the greater number of Jesuits assembled in Manila from the missions of Mindanao and Visayas and the colleges of Luzon should leave the country on the boat which was to be dispatched to Acapulco. On July 29, 1768, 64 Jesuits including the Provincial left the Pasig River for Cavite: on August 5 they rounded through the strait of Mariveles and on the 9th they passed into the port of San Jacinto de Ticao. Once in the Pacific, the boat that was bringing the exiled Jesuits to Acapulco, was buffeted by two very severe typhoons: one on September 8th to 10th and another on September 29th. The wind was reported to have been very strong and the waves were said to have been mountainous. Every wave shook the ship so tremendously that its innermost parts rattled and smashed up into splinters and scattered in fragments. The ship was unable to overcome the difficulties of the journey and was forced to put back to Cavite. The sufferings on board ship were unbelievable. One of the exiled members died.
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t

May
1769
A strong thyphoon along the china coast, especially at Macao. It lasted for 28 conscutive hours.
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t

May
1772
The vessel Rynsburg of a Dutch company sank south of the island of Meru in the typhoon which hits the coasts of China. Only 8 persons were saved after struggle of 24 hours against the waves.
u
t
27
September
1779
The church of Imus, Cavite, was blown down in the storm of September 27, 1779. In the Sesion de Definitorio of the 2nd of January, 1780, the Corporation Recoletana resolved to construct a new church of stone and roof it with tiles.
u
s

October-November
1780
In the biography of Fr. Juan Huy de los Santos, a Chinese Dominican who was educated in San Juan de Letran of Manila, we read that he sailed for China at about the beginning of October, 1780, but on account of three baguios, was forced to seek shelter and remain in Pangasinan for a considerable time. Macao was not reached until January 1, 1781
u
t
unknown
July
1780
The maps of Piddington shown a typhoon which moved along the coast of China passing south of Canton and Macao. All the ships wich were at at sea that night were lost. Surely, more tahn 100000 persons died in the storm. At first the wind was from ENE. At 8, the wind violently shifted to the SE. At midnight, it veered fasted to the S with the same vilolence, and having notice that we had come into shallower water. At dawn we fathomed the sea and measured 72 feet
h
t
14
August
1782
A strong baguio raged over Manila bay and did considerable damage in Cavite
u
t
10
August
1783
The packet Antelope, of the East India Company, was wrecked in a typhoon on August 10 in one of coral reefs of Palau. Captain Wilson praises the hospitality of the islanders who offered every assistance to build another ship and thus enable the sailors to return to England. The son of the chieftain goes to England under the patronage of the captain but dies of smallpox in London
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t

December
1792
A strong typhoon raged over Guam and destroyed the church and parish house
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t

August
1793
About the middle of August, 1793, three Recolct Fathers set sail from Manila to Visayas. The Rev. Nicolas de San Antonio, who had arrived at the Philippines on August 11, 1786, was assigned to Batan, Capiz. Rev. Francisco de Santa Rita, a native of Aragon and 24 years old, was to be the assistant priest at Mambusao, Capiz. Rev. Juan de San Pedro Mártir, a native of Zaragoza had been appointed chaplain of the Zamboanga Fort. Full of ardent desires and zeal for the salvation of souls, the religious Fathers embarked on the ship which was to bring each of the Fathers to his respective station. In the latitude of Panay, the passengers were caught suddenly by a destructive typhoon, which sank the ship and sent to the bottom of the sea, the three priests and all the members of the crew
u
t
10
October
1795
In a letter dated at Manila on January 6, 1796, and addressed to the Duke of Alcudia, Madrid, the Governor-General of the Philippines, Aguilar, gives an account of a typhoon which occurred on Tuesday, October 10, 1795, and which forced two English ships, navigating from Madras and Bombay to Canton, to make the Philippines and seek shelter and assistance in Manila. In view of the precarious conditions of the ships, the Government of the Philippine Islands offered to the sailors all help and assistance in spite of the political rivalry then existing between Spain and Great Britain
h
t
22
April
1797
When the news became known in Manila in March 1797 that England had declared war against Spain, General Alava took the whole fleet out of Cavite to go to plunder the English convoy which was to sail from China en route to London. On April 22, 1797, the flet ran into a typhoon. Four frigates and two warships were close together; the night was pitch-dark; collision was liable to occur at any time. The day before, a boat from Acapulco, then only fifty leagues from the fleet, was caught in this same storm. The frigate Santa María, which was ahead and was bound for New Spain got into the thick of the storm and sunk under the furious waves. The rest of the fleet was unmasted and cleared of everything on deck. The next morning all the ships appeared completely stripped, with broken masts
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t

June
1797
A severe typhoon passed south of Formosa and close to Macao. The Swift sank with all hands on board. The barometric minimun was 736,60 mm.
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t

October
1797
The historian of the Philippines, Jose Montero y Vidal relates that on October 1797, the ship San Andres loaded with valuable cargo for Acapulco was lost on the coast of Albay as a result of the utter incompetence of its commanding officer, D. Manuel Lecaroz who was a merchant of Manila, and, as such, utterly unacquainted with nautical problems and the art of navigation. This practice of employing as ship officers men whose profession has no connection with nautical sciences and the art of navigation was prevalent in those days particularly in voyages of the ships that plied between Manila and the New Spain. Fortunately, the crew of the San Andres was saved thanks to the help given by the sailors of the squadron of General Alava which happened to be there. Very pressing was the situation in which the General found himself when his ship was caught by a storm. There can be no doubt that there was a baguio since the historian Zuñiga speaking of the naval operations of the General Alava says: "In all those operations, our marines suffered very much. I believe they felt very little inclination to navigate these seas again because on several occasions they have been subjected to inminent dangers of being wrecked by the furious storms. Had it not been for their skill in the art of navigation, D. Ventura Barcuiztaga and D. Francisco Requelmo would have been dashed against the cliffs at the entrance of San Bernardino by two typhoons that overtook their ships. They had, however, the satisfaction of saving the cargo of the San Andres which was wrecked in the Naranjos, before leaving San Bernardino Strait, bound for Acapulco, and the Rey Carlos a merchant ship, which was returning from her trip to New Spain"
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t

October
1801
The existence of this typhoon is known only through the following paragraph, copied from one of the books preserved in the parochial archives of Bacolod, Occidental Negros. In the book, Inventario, of the church of Bacolod, the following statement appears: "The painting which was kept in the church of Bacolod, and had been ordered by D. Antonio de Remo, was damaged by moisture and completely destroyed by the typhoon of October of last year. And for purpose of record I write this note on this book on February 25, 1802"
h
t
15
September
1802
Although the word "baguio" is not used, yet judging from the context of the narrative and the season of the year, it would seem that the misfortune of the Nautilus of Calcutta should be attributed to a typhoon that dashed her on the shoals of White Rocks on September 15, 1802. During the night, a strong easterly wind prevailed and at dawn, it increased in force with overcast weather. The Nautilus was drifted to one of the small islands situated south of Nama Channel where it foundered and went to pieces
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t

September
1803
The maps of Piddington show two typhoons which disturbed the seas around the Philippines in September, 1803. One of these typhoons crossed Mindoro in a SSE-NNW direction. The other crossed the central part of Formosa. Very likely, it was one of these typhoons that was encountered by the ships Warley, Royal George, Bombay, Castle, Alfred, Coutts, Earls Camden, and Ganges of the Oriental Company of India in the China Sea, on September, 24. The winds were very furious, the seas mountainous, the squalls terrible and the rains incessant
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t

September
1803
The maps of Piddington show two typhoons which disturbed the seas around the Philippines in September, 1803. One of these typhoons crossed Mindoro in a SSE-NNW direction. The other crossed the central part of Formosa. Very likely, it was one of these typhoons that was encountered by the ships Warley, Royal George, Bombay, Castle, Alfred, Coutts, Earls Camden, and Ganges of the Oriental Company of India in the China Sea, on September, 24. The winds were very furious, the seas mountainous, the squalls terrible and the rains incessant
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t
1
October
1804
The typhoon, experienced by the russian corvettes Nadicjada and Neva, near Japan, was classed as strong and horrible by the Admiral Krusenstern. The fury of the winds was undescribable. The barometers fell 70 mm. in 4 hours. The barometric minimum was close to 680 mm. The calm lasted a few minutes. The winds sgifted from ESE to NE.
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t

September
1809
The maps of Piddington show a typhoon that crossed the central part of Formosa. It seems probable that this typhhon, mentioned by Piddinton, is the same as that recorded in the logbooks of Scalesby Castle which together with the ships True Briton, Cumberland, and Neptune was involved in the spirals of the typhoon, that raged over the China Sea, from the 27th to the 29th of September, 1809. Nothing has been heard of the Briton ever since: the ship is supposed to have been wrecked in the coasts of Hainan, if not engulfed by the waves of the sea, in the center of the typhoon. According to the observations of the Scalesby Castle, the mercury dropped from 758.19 to 749.30 mm in less than 12 hours, on the 28th: as the storm increased, the barometer fell at a quicker rate. The wind shifted from NW through NNE, E, ESE, and SE. After 4 o'clock pm the force of the wind was beyond description. The barometer began to fall very quickly: at midnight and for the next 24 hours it remained at 718.82 mm. "This is the lowest barometer I have seen," the captain remarked.
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t

September
1810
The maps of Piddington show a typhoon which passed through the northwestern sector of Luzon and the Balingtang Channel. In all probability, this is the same typhoon that overtook, in the China Sea, the ships Armiston, Wexford, Alfred, Winchelsea, Elphinstone, Woodforfd, and Cuffuels, all of the East India Company. On the 28th and 29th of September, the ships were located NW of Luzon, when the baguio passed them by the N. The sea was horrible and breaking heavily against the ships. In almost all the ships the shift of the wind was from WNW through SSW, S, and SE by S. The barometric minimum on board the Winchelsea was 741.68 mm.
h
t
12
September
1812
The maps of Piddington show a typhoon which crossed the Mountain Province and the Province of La Union. The man-o-war Tevas which was towing 5 other ships of teh East India Company, experienced a terrible typhoon in the China Sea from the 8th to the 10th of September, 1812. According to the logbook of the Elphinstone the winds shifted from NE to SW by W through the N. The Glatton experienced very heavy sea and strong gale from the W. The barometric observations on board of the Wexford are as follows: 751.84 mm at 12 o'clock noon on September 6; 749.30 mm at 12 o'clock noon on September 7; 748.03 mm al 6 pm on September 7; 746.76 mm at 12 midnight of September 7; 744.22 mm at 8 am on September 8; 741.68 mm at 12 o'clock noon on September 8; 740.41 at 6 pm on September 8; 740.41 mm at 12 midnight on September 8; 741.68 mm at 8 am on September 9; 745.49 mm at 12 o'clock noon on September 9; and 751.84 mm at 8 pm on September 9. On board the Wexford the winds shifted also from E to NW through N.
h
t
28
October
1819
According to Piddington, a typhoon moving NW by W from the Pacific overtook the ship Warren Hastings of the East India Company, towards the end of October 1819, in latitude 20º N and longitude 119º E. In the 28th, and while the ship was in 19º 52' N and the same longitude, wind shifted from NNE to NNW. On the 29th, the wind was from NW and on the 30th it shifted around to SW and SE.
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t

September
1819
The maps of Piddington show a typhoon which passed through the Babuyan Islands
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t

September
1820
The maps of Piddington show a typhoon crossing the islands of Busuanga and Culion, in September
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t
17
October
1821
According to Piddington, a typhoon crossed the Batan Islands, in October 1821. (2) The Spanish corvette Fidelidad was caught in the spirals of a typhoon on October 17, 1821 and wrecked off the southern coast of Lubang Island, with loss of all her cargo and death of many passengers and employees, who were being sent to Guam for duty
u
t
1
November
1824
On account of the earthquake of October 26, 1824, the garrison of Manila had to abandon the barracks and live for several days under provisional tents in the outskirts of the City of Manila. The typhoon that began October 30th, destroyed the temporary camp, damaged the buildings thathad been spared by the eartquake and sank six vessels anchored in the bay. The governor of Philippines reported to Madrid that the frigate Tetis and the corvette Esperanza, under the comand of Baron of Bogainville had arrived in Manila on September 18, 1842, and that on account of a typhoon which occurred in the night of October 30, the corvette lost her main mast, suffered other damages at the ancorage, and was delayed in her depature.
h
h

September
1826
The historical records of Lumban, Laguna, mention three great calamities of the year, 1826, namely, a strong earthquake, a fire that consumed most of the town, and a severe baguio. Perhaps this baguio recorded in the records of Lumban is the same as that mentioned by Piddington as having passed through Basuanga and Culion. The typhhon mentioned in Paddington occurred in September, 1826.
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t
26
October
1827
On December 7, 1827, the Governor-General of the Philippines reported to the authorities at Madrid that the English ships Cirene and Fly under the command of A. Campbell had arrived at Manila Bay on September 14, and have been sent to the Philippine Islands by Admiral Goge commanding general of the British fleet in India, to chase the pirates that were supposed to be infesting the China Sea and the Seas of the Visayas and Borneo. Conditions having been improved considerably by the efforts of the squadron of the Philippine Islands, the English ships considered their task unnecessary. The Cirene returned to Singapore on October 16 and the Fly was dispatched on November 2nd to render assistance and salvage the goods of the German ship Asia which, having left Manila on October 26th, met a furious typhoon around Lubang and was dashed against the coral reefs of the island
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t
16
October
1829
The ship Regente of the East India Company was caught in a typhoon between the islands of Cabra and Lubang and driven by the southwesterly winds against the cliffs of the southwestern coast of Lubang, where it became a total wreck
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t

August
1829
Two typhoons disturbed the seas adjoining the Philippine Islands in August 1829. One passed through Baler and the provinces of La Union, the other crossed the South of Formosa
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t
16
September
1830
The chronicles of the time mentioned three calamities which befell Manila on this day: the overflowing of the Pasig River which flooded the city, various earthquake shocks, and a baguio or colla of considerable intensity.
h
t
22
October
1831
On the night of the 22nd to the 23rd of October, 1831, Manila was visited by one of the most horrible baguios ever known in Philipine History. Frigates and brigs wgich were carried along by the typhoon then raging over the bay, either ran aground or dashed to pieces on the sea walls. The material damage was considerable, amounting to more than a million pesos. Between Cavite and Tondo alone, about 150 persons were found drowned. Official statistics give 33357 as the number of houses destroyed by the typhoon in Tondo, Bulacan, Bataan, Cavite and Laguna. To aid the typhoon sufferers, a national subscription was opened and funds raised regardless of regional demarcations or racial differences. The maps of Piddington show three typhoons in October, 1831. One of these passed Calapan, Mindoro, and headed for the sand-banks of Macclesfield in the Paracels. The third crossed the Batan Islands
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t

September
1831
The maps of Piddington show a typhoon which crossed the China Sea close to Macao
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t

October
1832
The maps of Piddington show a typhoon which crossed the Northern part of the Batan Islands
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t

August
1832
The maps of Piddington show a typhoon which moved along the south of Formosa and passed close to Macao
u
t
18-19
December
1833
'from December 18 to 19, 1833, there was a strong hurricane in both of the Camarines and in Albay, which lasted 16 hours, demolishing many houses, destroying trees, swelling the rivers and flooding the corn fields'. The barometer fell to 734 mm. And fear of the loss of the grain crops due to this unfortunate accidents was felt.
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t

October
1833
The maps of Piddington show a typhoon which moved along the China Sea and the western coast of Formosa
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t

August
1835
According to the maps of Piddington, a typhoon, crossed the island of Mindoro in a SE-NW direction. Very likely, this typhoon of which Piddington speaks, is the same one which crossed the Batanes on August 5, 1835 and which dably disabled the ship Raleigh. This typhoon was felt by the Lady Hayes which was then south of Macao, and the Levant which was then in the center of the China Sea in the latitude of Bolinao
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t

July
1835
The maps of Piddington shown a typhoon which crossed the island of Palawan towards the China Sea.
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t
18-19
December
1838
On December 18 to 19 of the year 1838, both of the Camarines and Albay had experienced a hurricane which lasted 16 hours. It destroyed many houses, uprooted many trees, overflowed the banks of the rivers and damanaged plantations. The barometer fell to 740 mm. Because of this calamity the total loss of cereals was feared.
t, h
p
28
October
1839
On November 8, 1838, the Governor of the Marianas reported to the Governor of the Philippines that on the 28th of October, 1838, there was a strong hurricane in the Islands of Guam and Rota, which caused great ruin, destroying dridges of stone and mortar, various houses, rice fields, and trees of the forest.
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t

September
1839
The historical records of Lumban, Laguna, state that in 1839 a furious typhoon lasting for a whole week was felt in that place. The maps of Piddington show two typhoons in the month of September. The first passed south of Macclesfield and west of Macao. The second crossed the central part of Luzon from northern Tabayas to northern La Union. Very likely, this second typhoon recorded by Piddington is the same as that mentioned in the records Lumban.
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t

September
1839
The historical records of Lumban, Laguna, state that in 1839 a furious typhoon lasting for a whole week was felt in that place. The maps of Piddington show two typhoons in the month of September. The first passed south of Macclesfield and west of Macao. The second crossed the central part of Luzon from northern Tabayas to northern La Union. Very likely, this second typhoon recorded by Piddington is the same as that mentioned in the records Lumban.
u
t
5
April
1841
A typhoon in Central Panay on Palm Sunday.
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t
unknown
-hNovember
1841
According to the maps of Piddington, a typhoon, crossed Palawan towards Conchinchina. That there was storm in 1841, is confirmed by the following passage from Cavada. " The town of Romblon suffered terribly in the storms of 1841, 1842, 1843 and particularly in that of 1867"
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s

July
1841
Two typhoons are shown in the map of Piddington. One of them passed very close to Hainan. The other crossed Luzon from Casiguran to Ilocos Norte and enterd the Continent between Macao and Canton.
h
t

July
1841
Maps of Piddington
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t

September
1842
It is recorded in the parochial archives of Las Piñas, Rizal, that in 1842, "in the month of September, there occurred a typhoon which destroyed the fish ponds of the church".
h
t
28
October
1843
In an official letter dated October 30, 1843, the Rector of the Royal Seminary of San Carlos reported to the Archbishop of Manila that "on account of the strong baguio which occurred on the night of October 28, several wood apartments and shell windows had been seriously damaged. Inasmuch as the repair of the damages would not require a heavy expense, the Rector begged that the repairs should be undertaken immediately." The existence of a baguio in 1843, is confirmed by the following paragraph taken from the historian Cavada: "the town of Romblon suffered greatly on account of the storms of 1841, 1842 and 1843, and particularly on that of 1867"
h
t
Unknown
April
1844
A storng storm in the China Sea between the Philippines and Macao.
u
s
13
November
1844
The typhon which hit the provinces of the South, near Manila, in the middle of November, 1844, should be classified as destructive. From the reports of the Provincial Governor to the Governor-General of the Philipinne Islands, the following details are gathered: In Camarines Norte the houses destroyed numbered 250 and the trees were badly damaged by the fury of the winds. In Camarines Sur, the typhon demolished 5 churches, ruined 13 parichial houses, 10 schoolhouses and 7500 private houses. Two corvettes were lost and a few passenger perished. The winds veered from N to SE through E. The baguio lasted almost 24 hours. According to the governor of Camarines Sur, this typhon was stronger than that felt in Manila in 1831. In Albay, the typhoon ruined 2470 houses, 7 granaries, 8 bridges and caused the death of 32 persons. The loss in the plantation of Cacao, abaca, sugar cane and in trees was considerable. The barometer fell in Albay to 720 mm. In the coast of burias, two corvettes were wrecked. Some interisland ships were lost in the sea of Marinduque: the chuch of Gasan was blown down and several houses of Mogpog were roined; more than 500 work animals perished in the floods of Boac; In Batangas, the winds destroyed 765 houses. In the capital of Tayabas alone, the wind blew down 800 houses. Except the typhoon of 1811, the people in Tayabas did not remember any stronger typhoon than this one
h
t
24
October
1844
The Governor of the Philippines reported to the authorities in Madrid that on account of the typhoon of October 24th several ships, ancnored at Manila Bay, had lost their moorings. The storm raged with fury and did considerable damage in the provinces of Pampanga, Pangasman and Zambales
h
t
3
November
1845
The books of the paroquial archives of the town of Imus, Cavite, contain the following: "On November 3rd, 1845, a baguio caused considerable destruction in the houses. There were no personal casualties, but the water was higher than that of the terrible storm of October 22, 1831, which the natives declared was unequalled in fury by any they have yet seen." This passage was signed by Fr. Martin Zubire, priest and superintendent of the Imus State.
h
s
7
October
1845
A violent hurricane occurred on the coast of Cagayan on October, 7, 1845. All the town, from Pamplona and Buguey on the west to Catarman in the east, were completely destroyed, the roofs of the churches and convents not excepted. Many persons and animals died. In Camalaniugan alone, 12 persons lost their lives and many more were seriously injured. The valleys and mountains were left completely bare, as if they had been devasted by fire. During the hurricane the earth was felt to quake terribly and the lighting was terrific. Nine town were destroyed and their ill-fated inhabitants were left in the greatest misery. Many of them, however, were aided in their suffering by the charity of the Alcalde and the priests, by the generosity of the province, of Santisimo Rosario, and its college of Santo Tomas, which donated P 4000, and by the iad of P 3000 which the Insular Treasury appropiated from the Community Funds.
u
t
21
November
1846
A strong typhoon raged over the Visayas from Northern Mindanao to Mindoro. The floods in Cagayan, Camiguin and Dapitan were extraordinary. The church of Calapan, Mindoro, was unroofed. The sailboats Enriqueta, Nuestra Sra. Del Pilar and Naval were wrecked.
u
t
1
July
1846
Romulando Jimeno embarked in Laphu on June 30, bound for Macao; but the next day, a terrible tempest broke out.
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s
13-14
December
1848
A strong typhoon passed close to, and by the south of, Manila. The winds from the second quadrant were very strong. The barometric minimum at Manila was 748.79 mm. The winds veered from NNW to SSE
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t
1
September
1848
The typhoon of September 1st, 1848, caused tremendous havoc along the southern coast of China. The sea waves around Catanduanes to the east of Luzon were enormous. "If the typhoon has overtaken us in the open Bashi Channel, the Bayonnaise would have been in great danger," wrote the vice-admiral Julien de la Gabiere.
h
t
11
August
1848
The french ship La Bayonnaise encountered a severe typhoon on her way from Guam to Loochoos. The winds backed from NW to SW and SE
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t
4
May
1850
A furious baguio was experienced in Manila Bay and the adjacent seas. The ship Juno experienced the fury of the storm.
u
s
9
December
1851
The historical records of Passi in the Island of Panay mention a furious typhoon which was experienced on December 9, and which demolished many houses and destroyed the church
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t
Unknown
July
1852
A baguio ocurred in July, 1852, in the coast of Indochina. A baguio caught the vessel by surprise and endangered the life of all passengers who force to land at Hainan.
u
s
23
September
1855
Owing to the scarcity of reports about atmospheric events pertaining to the Marianas, the items published in 1870 by an educated person who had lived for many years on the Islands, are of inestimable value. Speaking about the storms of the islands, he says: "during the 20 years and over I have lived in this island of Guajan, I knew of but one typhoon or rather violent hurricane, which was on September 23, 1855, and caused horrible havoc, blowing down all the houses of wood, and some others of stone, many trees, and some of them over a hundred years old. It destroyed all the nurseries and seed beds. According to what I have heard from several old natives, these hurricanes occur every 18 to 22 years. Except for this, I have seen various baguios or collas in the following months: February, about two; April, 2 or 3; June, 1; September, several; and November, various."
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t
8
November
1858
From a suit instituted in the court of Manila, we know that a storm passed over the town of Lallo in the Cagayan Valley between 2 and 3 pm Five cascos loaded with tobacco products were ready for unloading: one of them was sunk, with all its cargo; the material of the other four was damaged to a considerable degree
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s
18-19
August
1858
The Austrian frigate Novara, engaged during the years 1857, 1858 and 1859 in scientific researches and the circumnavigation of the Globe, was caught in the spirals of a typhoon that swept over the Pacific Ocean and the China Sea from the 23th to the 20th of August, 1858. Although the storm raged in the latitudes of Formosa or Loochoos, yet in all probability it was severely felt in the Philippines, to judge from the violence of the winds and the force of the waves that duffeted the Novara. The barometric minimum on board the Novara was 744.5 mm at 4 pm on August 19.
u
t
27
July
1862
The typhoon that hit Canton and Macao must be termed destructive. The victims were at least 40000 and the loss on property of millions of dolars. The aspect of Praia Grande after the typhoon was disheartening. The barometer fell to 726.44 mm.
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t

May
1863
The schools of the town of Pilar in Sorsogon were destroyed by a thypoon.
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t
12
December
1863
A national and provincial subscription was opened and a comitee was appointed for the collection of relief funds. The letters of the priests of the dioceses of Nueva Caceres which are kept in the episcopal archives show that the casualtieswere great, the number of widows and orphans considerable and the destrction caused by the typhoon constituted a national calamity
h. P
t
13
December
1863
When the typhoon season was about to end, a baguio was experienced in southeastern Luzon. In Albay, the baguio first came from the N and ended in the S with strong wind, copious rainsand thunder. In the district of Lagonoy, Ambos Camarines, the baguio was considered strong and furious. After raging horribly for 5 hours, the typhoon destroyedcompletely the temporary church, the courthouse and the public school of S. Jose and the Chapel of Quinasalan together with over 800 private houses. The Lagonoy River rose suddenly to sucha height that it carriedaway a good number of families, resulting in the drowning of 49 persons
u
t
29
August
1863
On the morning of this day, there was felt in Manila a furious typhoon with strong westerly winds from the fourth quadrant. The waves broke heavily against the shore and wharves producing an inundation which destroyed the Bagumbayan drive and covered the Sta. Lucia road with boulders. Several trees along the roads were uprooted; important specimenes of plants of the botanical garden were lost; the water level rose 1.5 yards in the Quinta market; and several houses were unroofed.
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t
6
June
1864
HongKong was hard hit by a typhoon that destroyed many houses, claimed many victims and damaged property valued at half a million patacas.
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t
7-8
December
1865
The Governor of Burias reported to the central Government that a dreadful typhoon had hit the island of Burias on December 7, from 3.30 p.m. until 3 p.m. Of the following day
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t
14-18
December
1865
For 24 hours the province of Leyte expereinced the effect of a heavy typhoon. It was felt in Albay for over 13 hours. Although this storm was less severe than the baguio of november 8, 1865, yet the damage done by it to houses and crops was considerable. The strong winds and heavy rains that accompanied the storm ruined the seed-beds od tobacco in Cagayan Valley and the rice fields in Nueva Vizcaya
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t
15-17
December
1865
A storm raged not far from our shores. The barometer at Manila fell to 747.32 mm on December 16th. The WSW winds blew with hurricane force.
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t
7-12
November
1865
Samar and Leyte experienced a heavy typhoon. Many houses were destroyed. The crop of Occidental Samar, about to be harvested, was a total loss. The goleta San Roque coming from Cebu was wrecked on the western coast of Samar, with a total loss of its cargo. The same baguio hit the province of Pangasinan; most of the houses were unroofed in Urbiztongo, Mangatarem, and Manaoag. The same typhoon was responsible for heavy flood in the Zamboanga district, Mindanao. The barometric minimum at Manila was 742.64 mm. It was considered as one of the worst typhoons both on account of its intensity and extension.
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t
2-3
October
1865
A typhoon moved across the China Sea. The barometer at Manila fell to 747.44 mm. on October 3 at 4 p.m.
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t
9-10
October
1865
A baguio, not very severe, was felt in the islands of Pangan and Agrigan of the Marianas group
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s
5
September
1865
Saipan, mariana Islands, experienced a very severe typhoon. All the public buildings and private houses were said to have been destroyed; the town was flooded to a depth of four feet by the sea; all fruits and many trees were felled. The buildings of Tinian were unroofed, although the typhoon was felt there with less intensity that at Saipan.
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t
27
September
1865
This baguio, according to Montero y Vidal stranded 17 vessels on teh shores of Manila
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t
April 28-May 5
AprilandMay
1866
A strong typhoon lashed the provinces of southern Luzon, Masbate, Burias, Panay and Mindoro. In Manila the barometer fell to 745,62 mm. A boat with 12 persons was caught by the storm near Providence of Sorsogon; only three persons holding on the keel of the wrecked ship reached land. In Antique the storm was dreadful, destroying many houses and driving aground four brig-schooners. In Masbate the storm caused the destaruction of 95 private houses and the wrecking of 4 schooners. In Burias, the typhoon did great damage to the port and the light-houses.
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t
14-21
December
1866
The heavy winds and rains experienced in Mindoro and Nueva Ecija together with the great flood of the Cagayan River indicate that Luzon was under the influence of a strom during the second fortnight of december
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s
5-9
June
1866
A severe typhoon did considerable damage to the Provinces of Cagayan, La Union, Ilocos and Abra. In Bagued, Abra, the winds shifted all around the compass. Seven pancos were wrecked off Ilocos. Five persons were drowned in Aringay.
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t
12-22
October
1866
Winds and heavy rains did great damage to the provinces of Morong, Cavite, Laguna, Batangas, Bulacan, Nueva Ecija and Pampanga. The rivers of Bulacan and Pampanga overflowed their banks. The flood from the lake of Pinac de Gandaba and Pampanga rivers was so great that the towns of Calumpif, Bocaue, Paombong, Hagonoy and Quingua suffered very heavily. In the north, the Cagayan river rose to a height unknown since the year 1846, with the subsequent loss of cattle, seed-beds and curing-shades
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t
6-9
September
1866
A heavy storm raged in the China Sea off the coast of Atique. A panco was wrecked in Bugason with loss of four persons. The heavy rains damaged the roads of the northern part of the province.
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s
3
May
1867
At 19:00 a terrible storm broke out in Leyte, resulting in extensive damage. The houses destroyed were 127. The same storm passed trhough the islands of Burias on the afternoon of the 4th. The brig-schooner Ntra. Sra. de la Paz went to the bottom, only one passenger being saved. On the southern part of the Barrio of Claveria, the 31-ton schooner Pilar sank.
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t
14-16
November
1867
On the 14th, 15th and 16th, a terrific storm was felt in the province of Antique which caused considerable injuries to edifices, woodlands, and rice fields. Most of the streets were impassable. Five persons died. On the coast of the barrio of San Antonio, the brig-schooner Bella Francisca, voyaging from Zamboanga to Manila wento to the bottom with a total loss of two-thirds of its cargo and the death of a sailor and a Chinaman. (2) Southern Luzon and Visayas experienced a severe typhoon. The buildings and crops of northern Samar suffered heavily. Many houses were blown away in the Bicol region. Three small ships were lost in the Romblon harbor. The plantations of Mindoro and Tabayas were damaged. In the town of Gumoca, the San Diego Fort was demolished by the impact of the waves.
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t
7
September
1867
On September 7, 1867, a furious baguio of short duration lasting only for half a day, but of considerable intensity, caused serious damages to buildings and plantations at Santo Domingo de Basco, Batan Islands
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t
20-26
September
1867
From the 20th to the 26th of September, Manila experienced a violent storm which caused the inundation of all the city suburbs. The Malacañang Palace, residence of General Gandara, became isolated, and the officials had to make use of boats to reach the place, all adjacent barrios being surrounded temporarily by a lake. This typhoon passed to the north of Manila. The force of the wind was hurricane for 10 hours. The barometer fell in Manila to 737.30 mm at 6 am on the 27th. Seventeen ships were dashed against the Santa Lucia and Tondo shores. The waves in Manila Bay were mountainous. The Ayuntamiento, with the consent of Gandara, distributed P3000 to aid the sufferers of the storm. The officials and the religious corporations exerted every effort to better the conditions of the injured and of those who were unable to leave their houses during the progress of the inundation. By Royal Decree of the 21st of December, the expenditures incurred were approved and La Direccion de Adminstracion was instructed to appropiate in the coming budget, a certain sum under the item "Public Calamities" to spend in similar cases of emergency. On the 25th of September a frightful inundation occurred in Ilocos, owing to the extraordinary flooding of the Abra River. The water reached a height of 25 meters above the ordinary level, killing 1800 persons and causing incalculable damages to property in Ilocos and in Abra. Returning from Hongkong where it had gone to get the mail from Europe the ship Malespina was caught by the terrible storm. Undoubtely, it got caught in the vortex of the hurricane in the China Sea, and wento to the bottom. The plain fact is that nothing more has ever been heard about the ill-fated ship, not even the slightest debris has ever been seen to testify to the unexpected end og the ill-fated crew and passengers. The anxiety of all Manila was excited beyond measure by the late coming of the ship they not knowing its fate. As time passed, anxiety increased, gradually growing in proportion from day to day and the suspicion as to the possible mishaps to these martyrs of duty became very serious. The commandant of the navy yard, partly to comply with his duty, but chiefly becauses some of the passengers of the Malespina were his near relatives, made unlimited searches, ordering several battleships and merchant vessels to explore the seas as well as the coasts in search of the Malespina, but all his efforts proved in vain. No results were they able to give, and until this day, the details of the horrible disaster are obscured from human knowledge. Five months later, on the 18th of February, 1868, the Army and Navy of the Cavite yard, paid the last homage of love to their less fortunate comrades who in the faithful discharge of duty went with the Malespina to the bottom of the deep. At eight o'clock in the morning of the said day in the church of Santo Domingo at Cavite, solemn high mass was offered for the repose of the souls of those that went down with the Malespina, and was attended by every official and employee on the roster of the yard. The church, completely decorated in black, presented a solemn but impossible appearance. In the center, an elegant cenotaph adorned with military and naval trophies made by different officials, was erected. On each face of the rectangular pyramid an inscription was engraved. On the two front faces were the epitaphs: "to the victims of the Malespina, Their friends." On the other two faces were appropiate words to cause those who sank with the Malespina to be ever remembered
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t
11-14
July
1867
The effects of a typhoon were felt in the Provinces of Camarines, Pampanga, Zambales and Ilocos. At Manila the barometer fell to 748.40 mm and the winds backed from NW to SW.
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t
20-24
November
1868
A heavy typhoon was felt in Catbalogan, Burias, Albay, Sorsogon, Camarines, Pangasinan, La Union, Ilocos, and Mountain Province. Three ships were lost in the Visayas. The rivers of Ilocos overflowed the fields with heavy loss of property and damage of crops. At Manila the barometer fell to747.47 mm and at Bayombong it went below 740 mm.
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t
28
September
1868
On this day, a strong typhoon was experienced in the island of Saipan of the Marianas group and in all the islands of the north, destroying the chapel and all the houses of Saipan, and completely wrecking the English ship And then anchored in Tanapac
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t
12-20
November
1869
A heavy storm, accompanied by wind and rain, was experienced by the provinces of Northern Luzon, towards the middle of November. The flood of Cagayan Valley was so extensive, so rapid and so persistent that it destroyed 5732 seed-beds, 128 fields and 63 curing-sheds. The animals lost were 148 carabaos, 161 horses, 188 cows and 163 pigs. Small sailing craft were wrecked and persons lost.
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s
20-25
October
1869
The heavy rains caused by this typhoon flooded many towns of Pangasinan and carried away the culverts of several roads. Many towns of Zambales were without communication for several days on account of the destruction of bridges and flooding of rivers. Many seed-beds and curing-sheds of tobacco were lost in Cagayan
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t
17-21
July
1869
The provinces which greatly suffered by this storm were Leyte, Burias and Mindoro. The towns of Boac, Gasan, Mogpog and Santa Cruz in Marinduque suffered heavily from the fury of the tempest, with the resulting destruction of bridges, roads and plantations.
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s
8-9
March
1870
A strong baguio broke out with fury in Samar, destroying churches, convents, schools and many private houses. Almost every vessel anchored in Guiuan was wrecked. Three members of the crew of the brig-schooner Sacra Familia were lost at sea.
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t
5
May
1870
Samar and Leyte experienced a devasting baguio, which in Leyte alone destroyed 400 houses, more than 15 bridges and many fruit trees. On the night of the same day a terrible storm was felt on the western coast Negros, causing the death of three persons and seriously injuring three others, and 247 houses were destroyed. The courthouses, school buildings and bridges fared ill from the typhoon. One day later, the storm, was felt in Iloilo with excessive rains and violent wind from the N, later veering to the E and SW. The sky was gloomy and the barometric pressure very low. The schooners San Rafael, San Antonio, San Salvador, San Miguel and San Vicente, all dissapeared in the sea. In the brig Januaria, only four persons were saved, the rest of the crew and passengers, 18 in all, being drowned.
u
t
11
May
1870
On May 11 and 12, a terrific storm raged over the provinces southeast and northwest of Luzon. The brig Porvenir was dashed to pieces against the rocks, and the Schooner Ganiza ran aground on the shores of Calibagan. The towns of Tiwi, Malinao, Bacay, Libog, Manito, Guinobatan, Polangui, Pilar and Bacon suffered destruction of houses, flooding of rivers and breaking of dams. In the town of San Jose de Lagonoy, 27 houses were brought down by the fury of the wind. A panco coming from Tabaco in ballast towards the Partido was wrecked. The waves stirred up in the China Sea by tempest were formidable. In Zambales, the pontin Mariño loaded with caravans of palay, ran aground. On the 12, baecause of irresistible southwest wind, the vessels Paloma, Remedios, San Miguel, Soledad, San Vicente and the brig-schooner Amalia all went to the bottom. On the coast of Candon, the Divino Verbo was shipwrecked. On the night of the same day, the brigs Jareño and Flecha, loaded with tobacco, were shipwrecked on the ports of Currimao and Dinique.
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t
3
November
1870
The storm of November 3rd caused enormous destruction, especially in the provinces north of luzon. In Tuguegarao, after a terrific north wind which lasted from three o'clock in the afternoon to eight o'clock at night on the 3rd, the wind veered to the east with such an impetuosity that no edifice nor house could fully withstand it, and if there were a few wich were able to resist, they suffered considerable damages. The Casa Real was totally dismantled. The Church and the convent lost a great part of their roofs in spite of being made of tiles. The carabaos and cattle killed were counted by thousands. As a result of the storm, many cascos sank, some prominent persons perished, and those who zealously strove to save bales of tobacco stored in warehouses, experiences bitter disappointment. In Isabela, the hurricane blew with such an overwhelming fury, that the old men of the province said it had no equal. The Casa Real, the convento, the courthouse, the tobacco warehouse, the schools, and the greater number of houses were severely damaged. According to the Alcalde, not even a single banana plant was left standing. In Ilagan, the church was razed to the ground and all houses received damages. Sixty carabaos, 28 horses, more than 2000 chickens, and more than 800 carts of corn disappeared. Even in the provinces of the south, the effect of the storm was felt. In Legaspi, a great swell of the bay was felt from the east of the fort, breaking on the shoals in the middle of the bay. Such surging was not experienced in previous years and it carried away a great part of the shore which was estimated at approximately 100 braces. The greater part of the roads of Albay and Camarines Sur became impassable, and the rice fields and harvest deplorable. In Bayombong, the storm was felt on the night of the 2nd and 3rd of November. In the beginning, the wind was from the south, without rain, dry and suffocating. Afterwards, however, it rained, and at night, the wind assumed such an impetuosity that it blew like a hurricane. Many edifices were destroyed. In Tuguegarao, at 8.30 on the night of the third to the fourth, the baromoter registered 714 mm. In the zone occupied by the storm, which was Tuguegarao and the towns of Itaves, very few houses were left standing, and those which remained were left inclined. In Tumauini, Isabela, the barometer fell 47 mm. thereby lacking only three mm. more to fall totally below the engraved scale. Even in Albay, the barometer fell to 743.71 mm. on the 2nd. In Manila, the fall of the barometer to 743.52 mm. on the 3rd was accompanied by gusts of wind from the southeast.
u
s
15
november
1870
A severe typhoon raged over Agaña, Mariana Islands, with strong winds from the first and fourth quadrants. Buildings, trees plantations, roads and bridges were greatly damaged.
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t
20-22
November
1870
The storm that raged over the province of Capiz on the 10th, 21st and 22nd was considered as the worst of those which the old people could recall. Rivers overflowed their banks; public buildings gave way, bridges collapsed and many houses were carried away. In Sigma the water rose to an unprecented height; roads and bridges were partly destroyed. The losses in the plantations and abaca fields of the Aclan region were enormous. Unfortunately the casualties were many.
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s

October
1870
At about the end of October, a strong hurricane was felt in the province of Misamis. Many houses and rice fields were destroyed. The river overflowed its banks and many herds of carabaos and cattle were drowned and numerous houses were washed away. A banca was wrecked, and its cargo of 400 cavanes of palay was totally lost
u
t
21
September
1870
Considerable were the damages caused by the storm of September 22-24 in the provinces of Luzon. In the towns of Ambos Camarines, it destroyed many roads, bridges and culverts. In Zambales four churches, one convent, one courthouse, two schoolbuildings, ten houses, seven bridges, three culverts, and three roads were ruined. The bridge of Hornos, Dagupan, was carried away by the current. The roof of Cava church in La Union, gave away injuring several persons who were inside the building praying. In Benguet, the camarin which served as a church, the convent and many cottages of the Igorots were destroyed. Both in Isabale and Cagayan, where the wind blew furiously, and the rain was excessive, the nurseries were a total loss. In the province of Abra, irreparable damages were undergone by the trees, public edifices, and private houses. The Abra River rose to a hoight of from eight to ten meters above its ordinary level. In Pongal River, Ilocos Sur, nineteen vessels ran aground, suffering considerable damages. In the different towns of the province, more than 1500 houses were brought down, seven churches and twelve convents were totally ruined, the rice fields were inundated, more than one hundred storehouses levelled, and the provincial roads damaged. The Amburayan River rose to such a frightful height, that on overflowing, it gradually wore away the land sixty meters southeast of the church of Tagudin, and carried several houses to the sea. While the tempest was raging in the north of Luzon, the barometer fell to 744.77 mm in Manila on the 24th of September.
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t
25-29
March
1871
A very severe typhoon crossed Visayas and southern Luzon at the end of March 1871. The water rose to an unprecedent height in Calbiga, Samar. The rice fields and todacco plantations of San Pascual de Burias were reported wiped out by the typhoon. The towns of Luzon mostly affected by the baguio wer López, Gumaca, Atimonan, Mauban, Lucban, Sariaya, Dolores, Pagbilao, Catanauan and Guinayangan in Tayabas and Batangas, Tall, Ibaan and Lian in Batangas. The point Dolores was wrecked with loss of 11 persons and all cargo.
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t
4
April
1871
A strong baguio crossed southern Visayas. In southern Leyte alone 300 houses were destroyed. The schooner Soledad was wrecked in the bay of Maasin. Many houses and roads were destroyed in Tagbilaran, Loboc, Valencia, Ubay and Taliban. Many public buildings were destroyed in Bacolod. The tows of the Aclan district in the Providence of Capiz were flooded. Several lorchas loaded with sugar were lost between Negros and Panay. In Iloilo the winds ble with hurricane force.
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t
2-3
December
1871
-
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s
2-3
December
1871
Between two and three o'clock at dawn, on the 2nd of December, 1871, a strong wind began to blow at Davao, from the north, and shifting to all points of the compass, it assumed the shape of a terrific storm. The effect of the typhhons on the gulf has never been of importance, but in this specific case, the wind began to blow from the southwest, 5 houses fell in Davaoand the municipal building was unroofed. In the towns or hamlets of the the Islands of Samal, every house fell. Zamboanga, on the 3rd, experienced a terrible tempest of wind and rain, the like of which was not seen for a long time before. There was so mush rain that at 12 noon, the borders and ditches which border the town of Zamboanga, became filled and at three o'clock, the land became so vastly inundated that it looked more like a sea. As a result, considerable damage was done to public works and private houses.
u
t
24
June
1871
A strong baguio did considerable damage to the Samar and the provinces of southern and central Luzon. Many buildings were destroyed in Legaspi, Naga, Daet, Tayabas, Lucban, Binangonan de Lampon and in Zambales. The barometric minimun at Naga was 746 mm.
u
s
2-4
November
1871
At the beginning of November, the barometers were low at Manila. On account of the storm the panco San Gabriel was wrecked near Marinduque. The rivers overflowed their banks in Nueva Ecija.
u
s
5
October
1871
The provinces in central and northern Luzon suffered very heavily from the storm of the first fortnight of October. In Dili Bay, Mindoro, the vessel Ntra. Sra. De Guadalupe was wrecked. The inundations in Pampanga caused losses in sugar and demolition of houses in many towns. The losses in public edifices, roads, private houses, crops, and property were terribly great in Pangasinan. On its coasts several vessels were lost and some persons drowned. In Lingayen, the water rose to such a height that within a shot time, it reached a height of eight feet above the town. Similar mishaps occurred in Nueva Ecija. In Baler alone, the storm damaged 27 houses made of nipa and 5 of wood. In Dicapulao, the convent, church, courthouse, constabulary headquarters, and the 16 houses of the mission were all destroyed, The inundations and wind were so violent in Nueva Vizcaya, that many houses were raised to the ground, and a great number of different kinds of trees were uprooted. In Lepanto, the furious wind from the south to the east completely destroyed everything that the storm on the 29th of September had spared. The constabulary heasquarters of Sabañga fell to the ground. The damage was greatest in Ilocos. In the afternoon of October 4th, the strong tempest from the NNW, accompanied qith an extraordinary and sudden rise of the Abra River, recalled to memory the inundation of 1867. On the 6th, the water rose almost as high as during the yewar aforementioned, causing equal inundation in San Vicente, Santa Catalina, Cauayan, Bantay, and Vigan. Although the inundation was not destructive as that of 1867, it, however, carried away 28 houses in Vigan, 50 houses in Cauayan, 4 houses of wood, 10 of timber, and 3 granaries of palay in Santa Catalina. The water reached a height of 3 to 3 meters on the main road of Tagudin. In Ilocos Norte, all the roads were destroyed. 460 houses disappeared; 1343 cattle, 842 horses, 761 carabaos, and numberless hogs and chicken were drowned. Various rice fields, enough to plant 270 cavans of Palay seeds, were left completely useless. In the town of Dingras alone, where the baguio and rain were very violent, 490 houses and 600 seedbeds of palay were destroyed. 670 cattle, 280 carabaos, 120 horses, 500 pigs, and 150 lambs and goats were drowned. Varios fields of palay enough to cultivate 7364 cavans of palay seeds; and tobacco nurseries enough to yield 800 bales of tobacco were carried away by the water. In the whole province of Cagayan, many edifices were destroyed, and the inundation caused three fourths of the crops to be damaged. In Bangued, Abra, the northwest wind blew with tremendous force for three days, with torrential rains. There was hardly any difference between thin inundation and the inundation of the year 1867. The waters of the river inundated the extensive rice fields of the towns, leaving the lasn and trees submerged from 5 to 6 meters and even in some places even to 20 meters below the water. Six bridges collapsed, 64 houses were dragged down by the water, 200 heads of cattle were drowned. The Igorots of the mountains of Bontos, Sagada, Ambuyan and Alab lost their crops os sweet potatoes and corn, and the flood carried away the seedbeds which the Igorots possesed in their ditches, formed by many years of work. On the banks of the rivers, some dead bodies of drowned Igorots were found. The force of the storm, combined with the impetus of the tides in the port of Aparri, was reported by the officials in the following words: "On the 3rd, the wind blew from the northwest, cool, and with strong rain, and continued until the 4th, when it was believed the tempest was over, because the wind had shifted to the west at midnight. But at the down of the 5th, the wind blew again from the northwest with greater force, and as the day progressed, the fury of the wind increased, and, at the same time, the tides swelled, and since the river drains in that direction, the whole sea rushed in and blocked the discharge of the river. The effects of this retention was so serious, that the whole east and south of the town was completely submerged in water, the inundation reaching as high as about a meter above the principal streets of the town. The combined effect of the tempest, the tides, and the inundations was the loss in Aparri alone of 109 houses, 46 warehouses, 1092 sacks of palay, 200 cavanes of rice, 850 oil jars, 4285 large baskets of salt, 30 carabaos, 8 horses, 92 hogs and 61 cows. The current, on its ebb and flow, carried a great quantity of soil to the sea, and opened trenches and ditches of notable depths."
h
t
29
September
1871
A severe baguio affected the weather of the Philippines the later part of September. It destroyed several bridges, roads and houses in Panay. Hundreds of lighthouses were demolished by the wind in Albay and Camarines. The barometer fell to 711 mm in Naga; in some streets of Naga the water rose to the height of a meter. The bergantin Carmen foundered near Pilar, Sorsogon; the pontines Carmen and Aguila foundered near Quinapagian Island. The baguio was severely felt in the provinces of Tabayas, Laguna, Nueva Ecija, Pampanga and Zambales.
u
t
23
July
1872
A strong baguio accompained by heavy rains occurred in the northern part of Luzon. On the coast of Zambales, the Spanish vessel were wrecked. In Abra, damages in roads and bridges were great. The riece fields newly transplanted with palay plants and the corn crops about the harvestted were completely destroyed.
u
s
5-9
November
1872
On the 5th, a baguio broke out in Burias, which although not as strong as that of October 12, was sufficient to destroy what the former typhoons had spared. The brig-schooner Consolacion anchored in the port aground in spite of the fact that it had three anchors cast. On the morning of the 6th, the brig-schooner Velarde reached port without sails, and the rigging torn off, having passed the night at sea, in the greatest danger, because of the many submerged rocks which surrounded it. In the greater part of the towns of Capiz, the culverts and bridges suffered injuries, and the rivers overflowed their banks, resulting in the destruction of many nurseries. In Cayan, Lepanto, strong gustly winds from the south to the east, cool and dry, were felt for eight days.
u
s
12
October
1872
The typhoon of October 12 left heart-breaking memories in the Philippines. In Pambujan, Samar, it lasted for 8 hours, and its results were the destruction of houses, and the ruin of seedbeds in the northern part of Samar. On the isle of Sibuyan, the schoones Salvadora was wrecked, and its cargo of palay totally lost. In Albay, a strong wind accompanied by abundant rain, blew. At 5 o'clock, it backed to the west and kept up with great fury until 6.30 when it backed to the SW, and, later, to the S, blowing with equally great strength until 8.30 at night when it began to weaken. The brig-schooners Ignacio, Ave Maria, Emilia and Ponon were carried away and dragged by the hurricane, until at last, they ran aground with considerable damage. The hurricane levelled to the earth 47 horses in Legaspi, 75 in Albay, 96 in Libog, 382 in Bacacay, 128 in Mahlipot, 942 in Tabaco, 443 in Tiwi, 88 in Camang, 54 in Ligao, 167 in Polangui, 29 in Libong, 51 in Barcelona, 19 in Sorsogon, and 26 in Gubat. In Daey, the storm began at 6 p.m. of the 12th; at 8, the winds from the N, NE, and E blew with a terrible fury until 4 o'clock in the morning, causing great losses in the province. In Camarines Norte, the houses that felt amounted to 200. The abaca plantations were completely destroyed, and the roads were made impassable because of the inundations and the great number of big fallen trees which obstructed the way. At 12 midnight the storm was felt in Lucban, Tayabas. On the anchoring ground of Calhayan, a pontin was wrecked and various vessels were damaged. In Naga, at noon of the 12th, a terrible tempest was dreaded. The barometer registered 29.85 in. accompanied by fresh winds and heavy rain. At 3 pm the storm was raging with gusty winds from the NNE. The barometer fell to 29.68 in. and continued until 8.06 when it registered 28.82 in. At this time, an absolute calm was experienced, which lasted from 6 to 8 minutes. Big black clouds coming from the SW, and distant thunder from the 4th, 3rd and 2nd quadrants were observed. A shift of the wind from the NW was to be expected; it came very violently at 8.15 with abundant rains, and lasted until the dawn of the 13th when the barometer had already risen to 29.75 in. It was singularly commented on by the people of Naga that the barometer had fallen 1.04 inches below its normal height, and that the descent from noon to 8.06 pm amounted to 1.14 in. The Administración de Hacienda, the bishop's palace, the Colegio de Niñas, the seminario Concillar, and the Hospital de Lazarinos became inserviceable. The force of the wind was such that the galvanized iron plates, weighting 6 quintals or more which were blown down or damaged were 125 in Sagnay, 62 in Pili, 295 in Iriga, 8 in Lupi, 605 in Libmanan, 113 in Baao, 176 in Nabao, 202 in Gamaligan, 57 in Gainza, 87 in Pamplona, 8 in Pasacao, 233 in Goa, 12 in Maguirin, 9 in Tinambac, 254 in Calabañga, 174 in Bombon, 160 in Guyapo, 209 in Majarao, 264 in Cananam, 33 in San Fernando, 30 in Minalabag, 243 in San José, 49 in Milaor and 250 in Naga. In many towns, the inundation was such that the water reached the height of two varas. In Morong, the tempest began at 10 o'clock in the night of the 12th. At 11 it increased to such an strength that it was considered a hurricane. This began from the first quadrant lasting in its fury for 6 hours, and at 5 am of the next day, it began to shift until 12 o'clock, ending in the 3rd quadrant. According to the reports of the authorities, one casco and one parao were damaged. The roads and fields also received considerable damages. The towns, which suffered most were Tanay, Binangonan, Pililla, Cainta, Baras, Jalajala, and Bosoboso. The strong winds from the N and E on the 11th to the 13th caused the destruction of the houses and nurseries of Baler and Casiguran. The damages in Porac were reduced to the falling down of 20 houses and in Zambales to injuries of roads and culverts. The storm was also felt in southern Antique and Northern Abra, but not with the same devastating effects as was experienced by the Bicol provinces
h
t
7
September
1872
This typhoon affected primarily the provinces of Northern Luzon. The gobernadorcillo of Aparri reported that on the 7th, the town experienced a storm that started with little intensity during the afternoon of the 6th from the East and the North, but later the wind shifted to the South where it was strongest. Two pancos loaded with 1000 cavanes of Palay went to the bottom. In Abulug, Pamplona, Claveria and other towns, the roads were destroyed, the edificed unroofed, and the rice fields considerably damaged. In Ilocos Norte, the churches and convents, as well as the warehouses of tobacco, school-buildings, dams, bridges, and roads received injuries.
u
t
21-30
June
1873
A great part of Luzon and the north of Visayas suffered under a persistent storm of southerly winds, accompanied by rain, which caused considerable damage in Masbate, Capiz, Romblon, Laguna, Tayabas, Zambales and Ilocos. In San Pascual de Burias, the landing was destroyed. In the waters of Aroroy, the Panco Ntra. Sra. De Consolación was wrecked.
u
s
18
October
1873
On the 18th of October, 1873, a baguio began from the north end veered to the east and south. It was felt in Catbalogan. The strong gusts lasted only for two hours, and did not create much damage. On the island of Panay, however, it caused considerable destruction. Thirty-seven houses in the town of Panay, 35 in Inisan, 90 in Jimeno, 14 in Balete, 14 in Banga, 400 in Calivo, 58 in Macato, 22 in Ibahay, were crushed down. Many churches, convents, schools, roads and bridges suffered a great deal of damages. In the towns and barrios north of Paragua, the storm caused many damages. In Culion, many houses fell, and various embarkments anchored in the port sank. In Linacapan, only one house was left standing after the storm.
h
t
25
October
1873
The storm, which on October 25, lashed the provinces of Tayabas, Batangas, Cavite and Batan, should be classified as destructive. In Mauban, with the exception of the convent and the church, and about four or five houses, almost all the others were blown down. Two hundred fifty houses fell in Lucban and 215 more were left useless. In Tayabas, about 300 houses were destroyed. The falling down of houses and the overflooding of rivers caused the death of more than 30 persons. In the province of Laguna alone, more than 200 persons died. In the province of Batangas, 154 houses fell in Tanuan and 220 in San Pablo. The vessel San Roque sank in front of Malabrigo. The towns of Lipa, Talisay, San Luis and Balayan received considerable damages. In Cavite, various embarkments were lost, and some persons drowned, because of the storm which lashed the province on Saturday, the 25th. On the coasts of Batan, several vessels ran aground, and on the coasts of Mariveles, the casco no. 280 was destroyed. The velocity of the movement of the storm was at the rate of about 12 miles per hour. It was accompanied by torrential rains, and very likely by the cyclonic wave. In Cavite the water rose about two feet higher than the normal height
h
s
28
October
1873
The storm which caused the greatest injuries in the Philippines in the year 1873 occured in October 28. The winds were hurricane. The fall of the barometer was very deep, and the sea was exceedingly agitated. According to the official report, in Samar alone, the strom, besides destroying the churches, convents, courthouses and schools of many towns, blew down 8 private houses in Motion, 67 in Quinay, 33 in Maquimalo, 35 in Canayan, 42 in Paticua, 90 in La Granja, 95 in Pinonayan, 30 in Barobaybay, 37 in Socjan, 40 in Mayo and 528 in Catarman. In Leyte, the town of Malibajo lost 11 houses, while Jaro lost 33. The tempest spent its greatest fury in Masbate, Ticao and Romblon. At 11 on the night of the 28th, the terrible hurricane blew over Masbate, and lasted till 12 on the next day. The barometer fell to 716 mm. In the town of Masbate, every house was blown down, including the church, the convent, the schools, the prison and the newly constructed courthouse. The officials reported to the Superioridad that in Magdalena, Lauang, Baleno, Aroroy, Mabo and Uson, the churches, convents, courthouses, schools and all houses were completely destroyed, and the rice crops as well as other grains totally damaged. The governor of Masbate wrote: "What surprises us most is that the thick forests were completely dried up, as if thru the effects of fire". The horrible typhoon was felt in Romblon on the 29th with a furious wind from the N which lasted from 8.30 in the morning to 12 noon, at which time, perfect calm was felt. But at two o'clock, the wind blew again, this time from the S, until 4 when it stopped, after having caused terrible destructions and damages in the towns. The barometer fell to 735.5 mm. The old men of the capital afirmed that the baguio had no equal. In Pola, Naujan and Tubaan, province of Minoro, besides the public edifices, more than two hundred houses were blown down. The towns bordering Balayan Bay received many injuries. Twenty-six houses in Nasugbu, 4 in Liang and several more in Batangas, Lemery and Taal were levelled to the ground. The maritime disasters were many. On the shores of Bitong, in Samar, the brig Caridad was wrecked, having lost all of its cargoes, and the captain and a member of the crew died. The brig-schooners Libertad, Matilde, Encarnacion and Vencedora ran aground on the shores of Samar, resulting in the loss of their cargoes. In Ormoc, the brig-schooner Matilde was lost, and its cargo of rice unsaved. In the port of Barreras, the brig-schooner India with its load of abaca, ran aground, while the schooner Bella Maria was overset, and only 10 individuals up of 23 in the ship were saved. The schooner Rosario which was loadind calantas logs in Usan, Masbate, struck between rocks, and the main mast was destroyed, while the top mast was divided into two. The schooner Romualda ran aground in Bulocbuloc, Mindoro, and because of the force of the wind and the waves, was dragged towards the shore where it was completely dashed to pieces, resulting on the death of seven of the crew. The brig Emuy and the schooners S. Juan and La Paz also ran aground on the coasts of Mindoro. While trying to make the Magallanes point, the vessel Valiente, sailing from Pilar to Bulan, was wrecked. A lorcha and a paileboat ran aground on the shores of Casiguran and Malinao.
h
t
27
September
1873
On the 27th of this month and year, a hurricane blew over Agaña and Mariana Islands. The barometric minimum was 740.41 mm. The wind veered from the NW to the N, NE, E, and SE. The nipa houses suffered considerably, and the roofs made of jigay which covered the government buildings collapsed.
u
t
30
August
1873
On the 30th, the barometer began to fall. The southeast wind blew with terrific fury, gradually increasing in strength until 8.30 at night. As a result, many rice fields and houses in Ticao and in Masbate were destroyed. At dawn of september 1st, the vessel San Antonio de Padua, which from Manila was going to Borongan, was wrecked on the southern coast of Burias. The strong wind which prevailed in Capiz destroyed various roads, churches, and convents.
u
t
4-5
March
1874
A strong baguio lashed the Islands of Samar, Leyte and Panay. All the houses of the town of Mercedes were blown down. The typhoon destroyed 201 houses in Balasijija, 20 in naval, 34 in Albuera , 14 in Maligabo and 10 in Merida. In Laoang only 20 houses were left standing. In Capiz the baguio lasted for 5 hours and its intensity was considered greater than in any other storm ever experienced in the providence. Two hundred and nine-three houses were destroyed in Panay, 120 in Luctugan, 150 in Cuantero and 60in Dao. Very strong buildings as churches and convents were nearly ruined.
u
t
25
December
1874
At the dawn of Christmas of 1874, a terrible storm was felt in Cangayan de Misamis, with rain and strong winds from the southeast. The storm destroyed 61 houses in Mambajao, and unroofed the church, convent, and other edifices. In Manihood, the tribunal, convent, and 29 houses were damaged. In Guinsiliban, the convent, school, and 54 houses were blown down. In the whole province of Misamis, the abarca, corn and palay plantations, as well as the herds of live stock and edifices, received considerable damages. In Cebu, the storm was felt on the afternoon of the 26th, accompanied by fierce gusts from the west which lasted six hours, and destroyed a great part of the houses made of loght materials, as well as the trees. The rivers overflooded, their banks, and various cascos sank in the bay. At 10 in the morning of the 26th, a strong northwest wind blew in Cuyo, gradually increasing in fury and in rain as the evening advanced. The destroyer Callao ran aground at the back of the church. The strong wind and the big waves destroyed the stone landing at Lacan
u
t
9
November
1874
The southern part of Samar suffered again from the typhoon of november 9, 1874. The storm destroyed bridges in Borongan, gandara, and Pambujan. The palay, abaca, sugar cane, and camote fields were damaged, either because of the violence of the winds or the excessiveness of the rain. In Almeria, Leyte, seven houses were blown down. The church belfry fell. The biggest trees were bent. The towns of naval, Leyte, and Caraycaray were inundated, resulting in the damage of rice fields and the destruction of the saw mill. Because of this tempest, the brig-schooner Union Bustariana, bound from Iloilo with sibucao to Hongkong, was wrecked on the coast of Antique. No less destruction was suffered by the brig Rafaela, which loaded with timber, was sailing from Zamboanga to Manila.
u
t
3-4
September
1874
On the night of September 3rd to the 4th, a terrible storm lashed the provinces north of Luzon. In the north of Pangasinan, 88 houses of the town of Anda were blown down, 64 houses in Bani, 32 in San Isidro, and 98 in Bolinao were destroyed. Various churches and edifices were damaged in the province of La Union. The storm ruined the Infantry headquarters of Vigan, unroofed the church at Candon and levelled to the earth various granaries of Palay in Santa Lucia. The wind, first from the N, and later from the S, caused considerable injuries on the dwellings and lands of the Igorots of Lepanto, and in the government edifices in Cauan. In the province of Isabela, the corn crops were totally damaged, and the banana and coconut trees were levelled to the earth. In Tuguegarao, 2600 sementeras planted with corn, 600 curing seeds, 730 houses and 74 culverts were damaged. In Enrile, 106 houses were unroofed and 485 corn fields destroyed. The captain of the port of Vigan reported the following observations made during the storm of September 3-4: day 3rd, 4 pm, wind NNE force 5, barometer 757.7 mm; 8 pm, wind NNE force 9, barometer 750.5 mm; midnight, wind NNW force 11, barometer 745.0 mm; day 4th, 12.30 am, wind NW force 12, barometer 744.5 mm; 4 am, wind NW force 12, barometer 730.9 mm; and 6 am, wind SW force 12, barometer 740.0 mm. At 6 in the morning the typhoon backed to the S and the aneroid barometer began to rise when the storm was 15 miles north of the capital.
h
t
17
September
1874
Between 5 and 6 in the afternoon of the 17th, a strong rainstorm accompanied by fierce winds from the N, burst over La Union, and lasted until 2 in the morning when the wind changed to the W. As a result of this storm which lashed terribly the coasts of Zambales, the courthouses, schools and convents of Santa Cruz, Bani and Anda were dismantled. In Bayombong, rain fell in torrents, accompanied by strong gust from the S. Tuguegarao, the tempest was accompanied by heavy rains and stron winds from the N which blew from 6.30 in the afternnon of the 17th until midnight. According to observations made by Vigan, on the 15th, strong gusts from the NNE were felt there, and the aneroid barometer fell to 745.0 mm. At 6, the wind veered to the S where it decreased in fury.
u
s
21-22
September
1874
The dawn of the 21st in Vigan was cloudy and rainy. The barometer registered 745.5 mm with calm. At four o'clock in the afternoon, it began to rain aplenty. The barometer registered 741.5 mm with a slight wind from the SW which continued until midnight, when it veered to the W and reached hurricane force. The barometer remained at 745 mm until 8 in the morning when the wind backed to SSW and to the S with much rain; the barometer at 747.7 mm. At midday perfect calm; and the barometer began to rise; in the afternoon it cleared up with a slight wind from the S. Jose Serra described in this guise the effects of the storm which burst over Batan Islands on the 22nd of September, 1874: "At twilight on the 21st of September, the barometer began to descend in a conspicuous manner. At 8 at night, a strong NNE wind began to blow, while the barometer continued its rapid fall. At 10, a hurricane of extraordinary intensity was present. The aneroid barometers registered 737.0 mm ay 11, the wind veered to the NNE with frightful violence, while the barometer continued its descent. From this hour until 1, the wind blew with such a terrifying violence that that the aneroides dropped 0.20 by 0.20, until they registered 724.0 mm. At the said hour, the wind veered to the E, where it acquired its maximum intensity, and produced the greates havoc. From this hour, the barometer began to rise as fast as it had fallen. At 4, the SE wind began to blow, and at 5, I was able to go out and visit the town. The typhoon was over, but it left in its trails desolation and death. This island, being very small, and very near to Sabtang and Isbat the typhoon was experienced in all these places with the same intensity as in the capital. The churches and mission houses received damages, especially on the roofs. The church of the town of San Carlos was completely destroyed. The tribunals and schools were left in pitiable state. Seven houses made of lime and stone in the capital collapsed. One hundred sixty-four houses of wood and cogon were destroyed. It should not escape notice that while in Luzon houses were made earthquake proof, the natives in these isles make their cottages baguio proof, so that the devasting effects of the typhoons in these islands will ever be as great as in any town of Luzon. The winds of this storm were from the 1st and 2nd quadrant.
h
t
28
September
1874
On the afternoon of the 28th, In Santo Domingo de Basco, the barometer began to fall, foretelling a storm. At 11 at night, the baguio was blowing heavy. The aneroid barometer fell to 739.0 mm. At 4 in the afternoon, the barometers began to rise, and at 10, the storm abated. The winds were from the 3rd and 4th quadrants.
h
s
22
September
1874
An extremely violent typhoon lashed the city of Macao, causing a considerable number of deaths and destroying a great number of public edifices and private houses.
u
t
1
January
1875
The storm lashed Samar on the last day of 1874 and the first day of 1875 dstroyed bridges and roads, damaged many plantations of abaca, sugar cane, cacao, coconut, and blew down 14 houses in Santa Rita, 60 in Sulat, 61 in Tubia and 60 in Laoang. It caused havoc in Burias, Cuyo and Culion. Several vessels wrecked off the coast of Zambales, resulting in the death of many persons.
u
t
18-20
December
1875
In Naga, the 19th dawned with threatening clouds. At 12 the barometers fell. A frightful storm was feared because of the hurricane force of the northeast wind. But he wind backed from this quadrant to the north and then slackened in its fury. Some churches and schools were damaged. In Calapan, at 10 a.m. of the 18th, a strong storm from the east was experienced, steady until 1 at night, when it backed to the northand ceased there at 4. Thirty houses were destroyed. The brig Adelaida ran aground. In Baco, between 8 and 9 in the morning of the 18th, a water spout passed over the town, destroying the church, school, tribunal and 13 houses. Shortly afterwards, the baguio came. Four passengers perished on a vessel manned by six individuals. In Laguna, the storm was also experienced on the night of the 18th. It damaged the telegraph wires, caused the overflooding of the rivers, and destroyed many fruit trees
u
t
23-30
December
1875
At dawn of the 23rd, a very strong storm accompanied by heavy showers and gusts of hurricane wind was felt in the oriental coast of Leyte. During the storm, the barometer fell an inch, and the east wind blew with the greatest fury. In Masbate, a strong colla was experienced on the 23rd. In Daet, strong winds from the north prevailed on the 26th, 27th and 28th. It was reported from Infanta, that very disagreeable wether was experienced there and the barometer showed a fall. The people suspected that it was due to the tail of the baguio.
u
t
11
October
1875
In Santo Domingo de Basco, Batan Islands, a baguio broke out, which, beginning from the NW, shifted to the 1st and 2nd quadrants, causing the aneroid barometer to register 730 mm, its normal height being 760 mm. The church and school of the town of S. Jose were left in a bad condition, whila many houses were unroofed.
h
s
24-31
October
1875
The typhoon which lashed the Visayan provinces and southern Luzon at about the end of Actober must be classed among the destructive baguios. At 4 on the afternoon of the 30th of October, a persistent drizzle accompanied by violent gusts from the N, and dark and thick clouds such that the horizon was limited to 20 meters was observed. The barometer of teh brig Progreso, anchored in the bay registered 746.75 mm at 7 in the evening, with dark sky, torrential rain, and strong wind from the NW. The barometer registered 744.21 mm at 10 at night. The torrential rain was accompanied by thunderstorm and electric displays. At 3 in the morning, the wind shifted to the SW, and acquired its maximum force until 8, and when it began to abate, and the barometer (which had fallen to 742.94 mm from 3.30) to rise. The damages produced in this district, according to the governor, were greater than that of any other similar phenomenon. On the waters of Ticao, the schooner S. Miguel, loaded with rice, was wrecked. In Romblon, the storm began on the 30th, at one o'clock at night with a northwesterly wind, and ended with a southwesterly at 6 in the morning of the next day, after having blown all points of the compass. The maximum fall of the barometer was 18 mm. In Calapan, the storm began with a strong wind from the W; increased in force the whole morning of Sunday, and blew with the hurricane force of a baguio, ending only on the afternoon of Monday, after having blown from all the quadrants of the compass. In Naujan, 105 houses were damaged; in Subaan, 10 and in Calapan, 40. The church and tribunal of Puerto Galera were blown down, and the roads of the province were destroyed. In Boac, in the center of the town, the water reached a height of three meters, carrying to the sea various houses, destroying all the bridges, and causing the death of 130 animals. In Santa Cruz, Marinduque, the bastion was blown down, and the crops totally injured. In Gasan the storm destroued 83 houses, inclined 35 and unroofed the church and convent. The damages in Camarines Norte were of consideration. The storm blew down more than 100 houses, and destroyed many rice fields and albaca plantations. In Daet, the wind began from the NW, later veered to the E, and remained steady to the SE. The following statistics show how great the damages were in Camarines Sur: in Nabua, 781 houses were blown down, and 142 carabaos, 184 cows and 616 horses perished; in Iriga, 140 houses, 70 horses; in Bato, 123 houses, 60 cattle, 190 horses and 165 carabaos; in Tigaon, 113 horses; in San Jose, 150 houses; in Goa, 347 houses and in Libmanan, 193 houses. The greater part of the towns of Batangas and Tayabas experienced abundant rain. The destruction in bridges and streets were lamentable. Even Cagayan felt the strong winds from the NNW, with heavy rains which lasted for five days.
h
t
18-22
July
1875
A terrible storm, accompanied by plenty of rain, was felt in Tacloban, Baybay, Barigo, Capoocan, Inocapan and Hilongos. The losses in rice firlds and abaca palntations in the Province of Leyte were considerable. The storm was felt in Catbalogan on the 19th, accompained by hurricane gusts which lasted for about 12 hours. The wind at firs blew from the NE, then veered to the E and later to the SE, where it assumed its greatest force, and later enden in the S. In Masbate, the wind first blew strong from the N, accompained by abundant rain. After 20 hours, it changed to the NE and became a hurricane. In Marinduque, the wind blew with such fury that 150 houses in Gasan were blew down, and the rice fields and coconut plantations were destroyed.
u
s
18-21
December
1876
Because of the storm, the towns of the provinces of Ambos Camarines, especially Daet, Indang and Labo, received damages. Many houses in Puerto Galera were blown down. The brig-schooner Leon ran aground at Calavite Point.
u
t
25-27
November
1876
From the 25th to the 17th of November, 1876, a terrible hurricane, unsurpassed in fury by other similar phenomena for 20 years past, scattered desolation and death in the islands of Mindanao and Visayas. The islands which suffered most from the havoc of this meteor were Bohol, Cebu, Panay, Negros, Calamianes, and the whole northern part of the big island of Mindanao, reaching as far as Paragua. More than 150 persons from distant parts of the Archipielago were the unfortunate victims of this doleful storm. Very many were the herds of live stock which lost their lives either because of the strength of the hurricane, or the impetuosity of the great floods which inundated the valleys. In the island of Bohol alone, more than 150 herd of cattle, and 70 of the carabaos died. About 50 embarkments trading along the coasts were at different points engulfed by the agitated sea. The number of churches, schools, and bridges blown down by the strength of the terrific gusts reached to 100. The warehouses and houses made of wood destroyed reached to the almost unbelievable amount of 500. The number of houses which were destroyed either by the water which flowed in torrents from the mountains, or the winds which blew in terrific gusts, reached the exorbitant figure of 2500
u
t
17-18
July
1877
It seems that a storm of small diameter ocurred in southern Visayas at about middle of July. The authorities of Inopocan, Indang, Hilongos, Matalom, Cajagnaan and Maasin reported that from 17th to 20th, strong rain with violent gusts was felt on the western of Leyte; the damages were considerable. On the 18th, a tempest accompained by strong rain and wind, lasting till the next day, was experienced in Balamban, Cebu.
u
s
3-11
December
1878
A typhoon in the China Sea moved to WNW through Paracels towards Hainan
u
t
3-15
December
1878
A typhoon probably formed SW of Manila and ina a nearly E-W direction, reached Cambodia, where it caused much damage.
u
t
23-30
December
1878
At midnight of the 23rd, a very furious hurricane, accompanied with copious rains and heavy squalla, was experienced on the eastern coast of Leyte. During the storm, the barometer fell one inch: the winds that blew with the greatest force were the easterlies. In Masbate, a strong gale from the NE was felt on the 23rd. In Daet strong winds from the N was experienced on the 26th, 27th and 28th. Reports from Infanta state that they had very bad weather, with a tendency for the barometer to fall and evident indications of the existence of a typhoon
u
t
12-15
November
1878
A strong north wind accompanied by heavy showers was experienced in Tuguegarao from th 12th until the night of the 14th, when it blew a storm.After blowing towards all points of the compass, it remained steady at the dawn of the 15th on the south. It was keenly felt in Nueva Ecija, Zambales, and Infanta, because of the swell of the rivers and the abundant rain. In Casiguran, the storm began at 8 in the night of the 14th, with strong rain and south wind which lasted until the dawn of the 15th, causing damages in houses, churches and convents.
u
s
11-14
December
1879
A typhoon in nearly WSW direction crossed the southern part of Leyte, Cebu, Negros and central Palawan.
u
t
12
December
1879
Terrible was the storm which lashed Leyte at about the middle of December. The rivers of Abuyog swelled to such an extent that the people had to stay in the ridges of their houses, being unableto go tothe mountains. The town of Hinunangan was destroyed. Only 20 houses were left standing. The number of houses destroyed in the province amounted to about 1,000. Churches, courthouses, and convents were blown down. The bridges and culverts gave way to the force of the water
u
t
22-26
December
1879
A typhoon formed probably near E of Leyte; it moved WNW through N Cebu and Panay and S Mindoro towards the China Sea
u
t
10-22
July
1879
A typhoon appeared off E of Mindanao and in a NNW direction moved towards NE Formosa; it entered the Continent near Checkiang, passed W of Shangai and recurved towards the Yellow sea.
u
t
8-10
November
1879
A typhoon from the Pacific moved in a nearly E-W direction, crossed Nueva Vizcaya and La Union and continued towards N Conchinchina
u
t
9-12
November
1879
A typhoon moved from the vicinity of Palawan, crossed the China Sea to the Malacca Strait. It passed very near the Ship Ancona, 11º N and 11º E; Henriett, at 9.6º N and 109º E and Mercedes at 5.5º N and 94º E.
u
t
19-21
November
1879
A typhoon coming from the Pacific, crossed in a WNW direction S Samar and Masbate, Romblon and Mindoro. It recurved west of Mindoro to NW and NNW. The barometric minimum near E Mindoro was 713.0 mm. (2) November, 20: this baguio entered the Archipielago through the oriental coast of Samar on the 19th. The brig-schooner Amigos anchored in Punta Barrera, Masbate, was damaged. The averae direction of the typhoon seemed to have been to the west. In the interior of the Islands, it deviated a little from its course, owing to the topographic conditions. On nearing Manila, it had the direction ESE to WNW. Then it curved as soon as it left the Archipielago. The diameter of the cyclone on passing the Archipielago was more than 450 miles. About it, Padre Faura wrote on the same day 19th: "The tempest seem to have an inmense diameter, and moves very slowly. Were the diameter of the tempest of snaller dimensions, nothing would be able to resist it, to judge from the sudden barometric fall observed in Manila. On the day following the storm, the ship Butuan, and the shooners Clementina and Registro were found aground on the coasts of Tabaco. In the province of Batangas, the storm lasted for more than ten hours. Various houses were blown down in Bosoboso, Antipolo, Cainta, and Binangonan. Because of the fury of the wind, the excessive rain, and the inundations of the rivers, the cacao, coffe, and banana plantations, as well as other trees in Zambales, were destroyed. The Alcalde of Bacolor reported the loss of 96 houses and 22 warehouses.
u
s
8
October
1879
The baguio which caused the disagreeable weather from the 6th to the 9th of October, entered the Archipielago thru the district of Principe. The region wherein its fury was spent covered relatively small region, although the area of low pressure extended to large distnaces. The track of the cyclone followed the direction WNW while crossing the island. The mean velocity of translation was 17 miles per hour. Although the tempest hit tangently Manila and the eastern coast of Luzon alone, it caused damages in Zambales, Tarlac and La Union. From the towns of Zambales were received reports of the destruction of roads, bridges and public edifices. On the shore of La Union, a pontin and a panco sank. The ships Ormoc, Pinedo, Chalton and Gravina, and the brig San Lorenzo felt the damaging effects of the typhoon in the China Sea and Philippine waters.
h
t
July28-August1
JulyandAugust
1879
A distant typhoon in the Pacific moved NW, it inclined to NNW east of Formosa towards the yellow sea.
u
t
18-22
October
1880
Coming in a WNW direction from the vicinity of Western Carolines, the typhoon crossed Luzon thru Manila and then continued to move across the China Sea to the Gulf of Tongking. The barometric minimum at Manila was 727.60 mm.
u
t
12-16
August
1880
Appearing between Jolo and Basilan and moving in a NW direction, the typhoon crossed Palawan and reached Hainan
u
t
21-31
October
1880
Appearing S of Basilian and proceeding NW, a typhoon crossed S Palawan and continued towards the Tongking Gulf
u
t
19-23
June
1881
A typhoon crossed the Provinces of Albay, Nueva Ecija, Pangasinan and La Union and continued toward the China coast south of Swatow.
u
t
22-28
May
1881
A typhoon appeared near SE of Luzon in a nearly E-W direction, crossed the Provinces of Tabayas, Laguna and Cavite: it traversed the China sea moving towards N Conchinchina. The barometric minimun on the steamship Elgin near 17ºN and 114º E was 741 mm. This steamer foundered in the Bombay reef.
u
t
June 25- July 2
JuneandJuly
1881
Appearing E of North Samar, a typhoon crossed this island and Sorsogon and recurving to NW across Camarines Norte, traversed central Luzon through Nueva Ecija, Pangasinan, Mountain, La Union and Illocos Sur and finally reached the southeast coast of China, S of Swatow.
u
t
27-30
June
1881
In Naga, the hurricane wind veered from the east to the south east and to the south. The destruction was small in Ambos Camrines. In Laguna and Morong, the storm caused the loss of many houses and considerably damage the bridges and roads. The fishponds of Laguna were all destroyed.
u
s
8-12
December
1881
A typhoon appeared NE of Samar and in a nearly W direction, crossed the Archipelago, through Albay and Isla Verde. In the China Sea, it lost much of its force. Heavy damages were experienced in Albay and Sorsogon
u
t
5-11
July
1881
This typhoon appeared near Iligan, Mindanao, and crossed S Negros and Calamianes in a direction towards the Tongking Gulf.
u
t
24-28
July
1881
A distant typhoon approached NE Luzon, probably while recurving N and NE.
u
t
May 28-June 3
May-June
1881
A typhoon was felt near Mariana Islands, ranging during five days ans wrecking the German schooner Maszo on the 1st of June; it was felt, as a distant typhoon, in NE Luzon, probably after following a WNW direction, when it was recurving to the N and NE.
u
t
7-13
November
1881
A typhoon moved nearly E-W, crossed NE Mindanao and central Palawan and continued to S Conchinchina
u
t
26-28
November
1881
A typhoon appeared E of Mindanao, crossed Surigao, and moved WNW through Bohol, Cebu, Negros, Panay, Cuyo and N Palawan. It continued in the China Sea towards Conchinchina
u
t
10-14
October
1881
A typhoon appeared E of Mindanao, moving to NW; it passed near E Samar and Catanduanes and, inclining to WNW, crossed Luzon through the provinces of Isabella, Mountain and Ilocos; finally it reached the S coast of China, near Hongkong and Macao. The barometric minimum on board the steamship Oaklands near Prats was 718.9 mm. The bark Geraldine Paget was wrecked at Pratas. Much damage was experienced at Hongkong and Macao.
u
t
17-30
October
1881
A typhoon appeared SE of Luzon, movin WNW and crossed this island through Isabela, Mountain and Ilocos provinces; in the China Sea, it inclined to W in direction to Paracels, where it wrecked the steamship Humbolt
u
t
5-8
September
1881
A typhoon appeared in the Pacific ENE of Manila, and moving NNW crossed S Formosa and entered the continent South of Amoy. The barometric minimum at Tainanfu, Formosa, was 736.59 mm.
h
t
12-19
September
1881
A typhoon formed in the China Sea NW of north Luzon, moved to N and NNE along the China coast and, inclining to NE, entered the Japan Sea through Korea Strait.
u
t
22-27
September
1881
A typhoon appeared E of Luzon and moved towards Formosa and the east coast of China; recurving to NE towards the Korea Strait, it moved towards Vladivostok. The barometric minimum on the steamer Europe at 39ºN, 130ºE was 716.0 mm.
u
t
27-6
September-October
1881
A typhoon appeared ESE of Manila and advanced to WNW through Camarines, Tayabas and Batanges provinces, doing much damage. In the China Sea, it gained tremendous development, wrecked some steamers and invaded Tongking with a high wave, which caused as much destruction as the fury of the wind. Twenty thousand human corpses were reconvered adter the storm. The barometric minimum on the steamer Fleurs Castle at about 15ºN and 113ºE was 717.50 mm.
h
t
9-14
August
1881
A typhoon from E of Luzon moved to NW, approached NE Formosa and China and recurved to NNE. The barometric minimum on the Steamer Friederic in 29.6ºN amd 128ºE was 723.0 mm.
u
t
16-22
August
1881
The typhoon came from near Palaos in NW direction, reached E Luzon and crossed it through Camarines Norte, Nueva Vizcaya, Mountain and La Union. In the China Sea it continued to WNW towards the coast N of Hainan. During this typhoon there occurred in Manila a hail storm and water spout on the 18th. The lighthouse of San Nicolas shoal, in the Bay of Manila, was destroyed with loss of the keeper and his family. Great damage was done to small craft in the Manila port. In the body of the cyclone there developed small whirls or tornadoes which caused considerable damage in several places
u
t
19-20
August
1881
At 8 o'clock in the night of the 19th, strong winds from the NW were experienced in Bangued. These increased in intensity until 2 o'clock the next morning and subsided from 3 to 4 o'clock. In Cagayan, the typhoon acquired considerable intensity and caused serious damages. In Baler, torrents of rain began to fall at 10 am of the 19th; at 2 pm the rains ceased but the winds gradually increased in force. At 10 pm, the wind reached its maximum force and the barometer registered 742 mm, having falled from 764 mm which it registered at dawn of the same day. At 11 pm, the winds abated for a while and at 1130 pm light rain began to fall which later on increased. At midnight, hurricane winds with heavy squalls accompanied with heavy and incessant rains were again experienced
u
t
24-28
August
1881
The typhoon appeared NE of Luzon moving to WNW, and inclining to N and NE, moved along the Formosa Channel and the eastern coast of China. Much damage was done in the Shanghai region. The barometric minimum at Zikawei was 747.0 mm
u
t
19-26
October
1881
A typhoon passed near Guam on the 20th; it advanced to W by N approachin NE Luzon, where it slowed down, during three days, probably recurving to N. Heavy rains in N Luzon.
u
t
24-30
October
1881
A typhoon appeared E of Luzon moved in NNE direction and recurved between Luzon and Formosa to the E or the ENE
u
t
7-14
April
1882
A typhoon appeared East of Southern Mindanao, crossed the island in a WNW direction, approached Southern Negros and entered the China Sea through northern Palawan.
u
t
29-31
December
1882
The typhoon appeared east of Northern Mindanao moving NNW, crossed N Suriago and continued along San Juanico Strait towards Sorsogon, Albay and Camarines; it filled up in the sea E of Manila with diluvial rains
u
t
19-22

1882
A typhoon appeared ESE of Manila in NW direction, after approaching NE Luzon, it probably recurved to N and NE.
u
t
July25-August7
JulyandAugust
1882
This typhoon came from E of north Mindanao in a NW direction crossed Bashi Channel towards the Formosa Channel and later near N Formosa recurved to NE approaching the S coast of Japan. It was of a terrible violence and extension. The barometric minimun on the Menzalhe near N of Formosa was 733 mm.
u
t
3-8
November
1882
Appearing north of the Western Carolines, the typhoon crossed the provinces of Camarines and Tayabas, passed very near S of Manila and continued towards the Tongking Gulf
u
t
7-9
October
1882
A far distant typhoon developed towards the NE of Manila in tha Pacific. The barometric minimum on the Am. Bark Elle S. Thayer at about 30.7º N and 132º E was 733.79 mm.
h
t
18-22
October
1882
Coming in a WNW direction from the vicinity of Western Carolines, the typhoon crossed Luzon through the N of Manila and then continued to move accross the China Sea to the Gulf of TongKing. The barometric minimum at Manila was 727.60 mm. It is known as the great typhoon of Manila and near provinces.
u
t
23-27
October
1882
The typhoon apparently formed W of South Negros and moving to WNW through north Palawan, reached south Hainan. The barometric minimum on bark Caridad 16º N 112º E was 726.43 mm.
u
t
5-14
September
1882
A typhoon developed in the Pacific, some distance from our Islands; it appeared E of Visayas, moving in a NW direction and recurved to N and NNE near N Formosa towards the Korea Channel
u
t
22-27 27-6
SeptemberOctober
1882
A distant typhoon developed in the Pacific ENE or NE of Manila. (2) This distant typhoon appeared ESE of Manila in the Pacific before reaching Luzon; it seems that it divided itself; one small branch crossed Luzon through Bulacan and Pampanga and filled up in the China Sea; while the main body continued to NNW and later NNE towards Japan. The barometric minimum on the steamer Tanais S of west Japan was 728.0 mm.
u
t
14-17
July
1882
A typhoon appeared ENE of Manila in a WNW direction, crossed the Balintang Channel and continued moving towards the Continent near SW of Hongkong.
u
t
8-12
July
1882
A depression began W of Mindanao and its northward motion crossed S Palawan and moved towards the Formosa Channel. It entered the Continent S of Amoy. It seems that this typhoon divided itself, while it was SW of Luzon: the main body went westwards towards the Tongking Gulf and detached branch moved to Emuy.
u
s
13-19
March
1883
A depression or thyphoon raged in the Pacific and from SE of Luzon moved NNW and later to NNE towards southern Japan.
u
s
24-30
April
1883
Appearing off the East of Mindanao and moving in a WNW direction, the typhoon crossed Surigao, N Cebu, Capiz and Mindoro; then in the China Sea, it inclined to the NNW and reached the Continent near Swatow. Barometric minimun at Taganaan was 732,10 mm.
u
t
5-15
June
1883
A typhoon appared E of north Luzon, moved very slowly to NW towards the Formosa Channel and entered the Continent.
u
t
15-18
May
1883
A thyphoon moved across Leyte and Samar to Mindoro Strait. Hurricane winds were experienced near the center.
u
t
19-26
May
1883
A typhoon coming from E of Samar, crossed the northern part of this island in a WNW direction approaching southern Mindoro and passed on to the China Sea.
u
t
25-26
May
1883
A small typhoon probably formed near western Masbate and moved westwards across Mindoro towards the China Sea. The barometric minimun at Pola was 749.95 mm with hurricane winds.
u
t
8-12
July
1883
This typhoon appeared east of N Samar and in a WNW direction crossed Isabela and Ilocos Provinces, continuing towards the S coast of china near Macao. The barometric minimun at La Isabela was 739 mm, and at Macao was 733 mm.
u
t
21-26
July
1883
A typhoon formed W of Luzon, and moving to NW reached the Continent SW of Macao.
u
t
26-29
July
1883
A typhoon moved ENE of Luzon to NE and ENE into the Pacific.
u
t
1-3
November
1883
A typhoon appeared to the SE of Manula and partially filled up, entering the Archipielago, continuining westward as a depression.
u
t
14-17
November
1883
A typhoon crossed the Archipielago through Visayas, in a nearly WNW direction towards the China Sea
u
t
5-6
October
1883
A typhoon moved to the E of Luzon and inclined to the N without approaching the Archipielago
u
t
28-31
October
1883
A typhoon crossed S of Manila in a NW direction and inclining to WNW, moved towards the Gulf of Tongking. The barometric minimum at Manila was 747.82 mm.
h
t
4-9
September
1883
A typhoon appeared to the E of Visayas and divided itself into two branches, one after crossing north Samar and Masbate, recurved towards Camarines Norte and followed the E coast of Luzon while the other moved WNW through Visayas in direction to the China Sea and recurving to NW, reached the Continent not far W of Hongkong
u
t
28-2
September-October
1883
A typhoon crossed Luzon through the provinces of Nueva Vizcaya, Mountain and Ilocos Sur and continued to WNW, entering the Continent SW of Hongkong
u
t
13-17
August
1883
A typhoon developed in the Pacific E and ENE of Manila recurving to NE
u
t
27-31
May
1884
A typhoon approached NE Luzon, and continued recurving towards N and NE.
u
t
3-9
July
1884
A typhoon crossed N Luzon in a WNW direction towards Hainan
u
t
8-12
July
1884
A typhoon developed in the Pacific and moved NW very near the northeastern coast of Luzon; it continued to S Formosa and entered the continent to NE towards Korea strait and Japan Sea.
u
t
19-26
July
1884
A typhoon developed at some distance to the E and NE of Luzon, moved to NW, entred the Continent N of Foochow and recurving to N and NE, reached the Yellow Sea and N Korea.
u
t
23-28
July
1884
This typhoon moved in the Pacific to NW and passed acrooss N Luzon. It continued towards the Tongking Gulf.
u
t
16-20
November
1884
A typhoon passed N, but very near Manila, crossed the provinces of Nueva Ecija to Zambales in an E-W direction. In the China Sea, it inclined to th WSW, SW and SSW when near Conchinchina
u
t
25-27
October
1884
A typhoon passed S of Manila through Visayas
u
t
6-12
September
1884
A typhoon crossed the N end of Luzon moving to WNW and entered the Continent near Macao
u
t
18-24
September
1884
A typhoon moved near the E and NE Luzon and crossed SW Formosa
u
t
2-8
August
1884
A typhoon was felt in NE Luzon inclining to NNE and later to NE, it followed the SW and S coasts of Japan
u
t
19-22
August
1884
A typhoon crossed N Luzon through Isabela and Ilocos Sur and inclining to NNW, entered the Continent near Swatow
u
t
11-19
July
1884
A typhoon raged in the Pacific, near NE of Luzon, moving to NW; it continued towards the Continent S of Ningpo.
u
t
11-16
September
1884
A typhoon moved to NW near E and NE Luzon and recurved to N and NE
u
t
23-28
April
1885
A small but deep typhoon crossed from Siargao and Dinagat Islands to W by N through Cebu, Negros, Panay and Northern Palawan towards China sea.
u
t
June 25- July 2
JuneandJuly
1885
A typhoon appeared towards the NE of Luzon; it was recurving to NNE when felt in Luzon, and continued on crossing Nippon, E of Osaka.
u
t
10-17
May
1885
A typhoon was moving in the Pacific E of Luzon and recurving to NE
u
t
5-10
November
1885
A typhoon appeared to the E of NE Mindanao and moved to the WNW through N of Camarines and the provinces of Nueva Ecija, Pangasinan and La Union; inclining to the NW, it recurved near W of N Luzon to NE through Batanes towards Japan
u
t
13-17
October
1885
A typhoon in the Pacific E of Manila was moving WNW, recurved to NE and passed near the S coast of Japan
u
t
2-6
September
1885
A typhoon in the Pacific near NE Luzon recurved to N towards Korea Strait
u
t
13-14
August
1885
A very distant typhoon to the NE of Luzon, very likely recurving to NE, affected the weather of Luzon
u
t
15-18
August
1885
A typhoon formed in the China Sea W of Luzon, moved N and afterwards to NW and entered the Continent near Macao
u
t
18-26
August
1885
A typhoon appeared ESE of Manila, moved to NW, crossed S of Formosa and entered the Continent near Foochow. The barometric minimum at Ocksen was 724.5 mm
u
t
18-26
July
1885
A typhoon raged in the Pacific,not far from NE of Luzon; it recurved to N and NNE and finally crossed E Korea. The barometric minimum on board the steamship Cicero at 29° N, 125° E, was 723.6 mmm.
u
t
9-13
June
1886
A typhoon apppeared ENE of north Luzon, moved E-W and crossing Balingtan Channel inclining to WSW towards S of Hainan.
u
t
11-19
June
1886
A distant typhoon in the Pacific to the E and NE of Manila moved to WNW, reached the Continent, recurved to the NE some distance W of Shanghai.
u
t
17-23
December
1886
A typhoon passed south of Manila, crossed Visayas through NE Mindanao and N Palawan. In the China Sea, it recurved to N and NE and passed through Batanes
u
t
9-14
July
1886
A distant typhoon in the Pacific moved NW and recurved to NE while E of Batanes.
u
t
22-26
July
1886
A typhoon appeared in the Pacific E and NE of Manila, moving WNW; W of Batanes it recurved sharply to ENE, crossed S end of Formosa, and inclining to NNE reached S Korea.
u
t
15-19
November
1886
A typhoon passed south of Manila through Visayas or N Mindanao; it filled up and gave diluvial rains and strong winds in Mindanao and Jola
u
t
7-15
October
1886
A typhoon moved from ESE of Manila to WNW through north Luzon; in the China Sea, it moved to W towards the continent between Hongkong and Amoy
h
t
5-9
September
1886
A distant typhoon moved in the Pacific E and NE on Manila, it continued to NNE and passed E of Nagasaki. The barometric minimum on board steamer Killarney at about 21ºN, 128ºE, was 716.0 mm.
u
t
11-15
September
1886
A distant typhoon appeared NE and N of Manila, it passed near N Luzon moving to WNW.
u
t
14-19
September
1886
A typhoon appeared to NNE of Luzon, after recurving to NNE, it crossed SW Japan
u
t
15-20
September
1886
A typhoon raged in the China Sea NNW of Manila, it moved to NNE, later inclined to N and NW and entered the Continent near Amoy.
u
t
20-27
September
1886
A typhoon appeared in the Pacific E and NE of Manila, after recurving to NE, it passed south of SW Japan
u
t
10-14
August
1886
A typhoon appeared in the Pacific E and NE of Luzon, moving N; it recurved to NW and passed near N Formosa towards the Continent.
u
t
11-16
August
1886
A distant typhoon appeared NE of Luzon; moving to WNW, it entered the Continent S of Ningpo
u
t
16-24
August
1886
A typhoon developed in the Pacific E and NE of Manila, recurved to NNE and crossed SW Japan
u
t
27-29
August
1886
A typhoon or depression appeared E of Manila, crossed Luzon through Cagayan and Ilocos Sur, moving to WNW; inclining to W, it continued in the China Sea
u
t
July 26 - August 3
JulyandAugust
1886
A typhoon from the Pacific appeared E of Manila and recurved to NNE towards Korea strait.
u
t

October
1886
A distant typhoon appeared to the NE of Luzon, movin NW and recurved to N and NE, approaching SE Japan
u
t
12-15
October
1886
A typhoon crossed Visayas in a WNW direction from N Leyte to Calamianes. The steamship Proponti met it near 13.9º N and 115º E with great danger. The barometric minimum on board of the steamship Proponti was 731.51 mm. It was severely felt at Culion
h
t
March 28-April 2
MarchandApril
1887
A depression formed north of Mindanao, which developed afterwards into a thyphoon, and moved to WNW through northern Palawan towards Conchinchina.
u
s
12-22
April
1887
A typhoon from S of Palau moved to NW and recurving East of southern Formosa to N and NE approached south Japan.
t
t
21-26
April
1887
A depression crossed Mindanao and Palawan and in the China sea it developed into a small typhoon.
u
s
2-8
June
1887
A distant typhoon moving in the Pacific E and NE of Luzon and recurved to NE.
u
t
5-10
June
1887
A depression appeared E of Luzon crossed the center of this island and continued to WNW towards the continent W of HongKong.
u
s
15-19
June
1887
A typhoon to the NE of Luzon moved northwards and recurved to NE.
u
t
27-30
June
1887
A typhoon crossed Samar in a E-W direction to China Sea and reached W Conchinchina.
u
t
28-30
June
1887
A shallow typhoon crossed Visayan Islands from south Leyte to north Panay and south Mindoro.
u
t
10-15
December
1887
A depression passed through Visayan Islands towards the China Sea
u
s
18-20
December
1887
A depression crossed the Visayas in the direction towards the China Sea
u
s
10-14
May
1887
A typhoon appeared E of Luzon, recurved to N and NE at a great distance E of Luzon.
u
t
19-22
May
1887
A typhoon raged in the China Sea W of Mindoro and moved WNW towards N Conchinchina
u
t
25-29
May
1887
A distant typhoon raged in the Pacific E and NE of Luzon; it recurved to NE. The barometric minimun on board the brig Allic Bowe at about 19º 57' N and 130º 45' E was 721.00 mm.
u
t
May 27- June 3
MayandJune
1887
In the whole coast of of ILocos, a strong baguio from the southwest was felt. The Abra river overfloadeed its banks. The water carried away some bridges in Pangasinan. In Isabela the typhoon-rains damaged the todacco leaves which were ready for cutting. The rain accompanied by strong gusts from the south caused great damage to edifices, bridges and culverts made of wood. The wind was very strong in Zambales.
u
s
16-24
July
1887
A typhoon developed in the China Sea W of Luzon moving to NW and finally to WNW towards N of Hainan.
u
t
22-27

1887
A typhoon appeared to the NE and NNE of Luzon and moved towards E Formosa and the Continent.
u
t
7-9
November
1887
A depression crossed Visayas far to the south of Luzon
u
s
13-18
November
1887
A depression crossed in the direction E-W from Surigao Strait to central Palawan and continued towards Conchinchina
u
s
24-28
November
1887
A typhoon crossed Visayas from S Leyte to N Panay and Calamianes, and continued in the China Sea, recurving to NW
u
t
1-3
October
1887
A typhoon raged in the China Sea SW of Mindoro moving WNW towards Conchinchina
u
t
4-6
September
1887
A typhoon developed in the China Sea, moving WNW from W of Visayas to Hainan and the Tongking Gulf
u
t
9-14
September
1887
A typhoon appeared E of Luzon and moved to WNW. Increasing in intensity, it crossed between Luzon and Formosa in a WNW direction towards the coast S of Amoy. The barometric minimum in the sea at 119ºE and 20.5ºN was 720.0 mm. Finally it recurved to W and WSW towards the Tongking Gulf
u
t
14-18
September
1887
A typhoon of small diameter appeared to the E of Luzon and moved to WNW, it crossed Babuyan Islands and entered China SW of Hongkong
u
t
18-22
September
1887
A typhoon in a WNW direction crossed Luzon through the provinces of Nueva Vizcaya, Mountain and La Union, and continued towards N Hainan
u
t
22-27
September
1887
A typhoon appeared E of Luzon, crossed Isabela and Ilocos Sur and, continuining to WNW, reached the Tongking Gulf
u
t
28-4
September-October
1887
A typhoon passed some distance N of Albay and Camarines; it crossed the provinces of Nueva Ecija, Tarlac and Zambales, in a nearly E-W direction, and reached N Conchinchina
u
t
13-16
August
1887
A typhoon appeared in the China Sea W of Luzon and moved WNW towards the Tongking Gulf
u
t
21-25
August
1887
A distant typhoon to the NE of Luzon, moved to WNW, crossed south Formosa and it filled up W of Formosa Channel
u
t
28-3
August-September
1887
A distant typhoon appeared to NE and NNE of Luzon and recurved to NE towards Japan
u
t
7-10
July
1887
A typhoon crossed the Archipielago N of Mindanao and Cuyo; it developed greater intensity in the China Sea, continuing to NW towards the Tongking Gulf.
u
t
12-15
July
1887
A distant typhoon appeared to the NE of Luzon recurving to N, towards southwestern Japan. The barometric minimun at Nagasaki on the 12th was 728.8 mm.
u
t
14-21
July
1887
The typhoon moved from W of southern Luzon in a N direction wich soon changed to the WNW as it proceeded towards the Hainan Strait.
u
t
July 27- August 3
JulyandAugust
1887
A distant typhoon appeared to the NE of Luzon recurving to NNE, towards southwestern Japan.
u
t

October
1887
A distant typhoon appearde to the E of Luzon, moved NNW and recurved to N and NNE towards SW Japanu
u
t
10-14
June
1888
A distant typhoon in the China Sea moved WNW. It filled up before reaching the coast,SW of HongKong.
u
t
13-19
June
1888
A typhoon in the pacific approached N Luzon in its way toward the WNW. It reached the China coast, NE of Hongkong.
u
t
22-25
June
1888
A distant typhoon moved in the Pacific to the E and and NE of Luzon and recurved to NE.
u
t
4-7
December
1888
A typhoon moved across Visayas ina direction towards the China Sea
u
t
14-19
May
1888
A typhoon raged in the China Sea, SW of Luzon; it moved to N without approaching this Islands.
u
t
7-12
July
1888
A typhoon developed in the China Sea, W of Luzon. It moved WNW and afterwards W towards S TongKing Gulf.
u
t
15-20
November
1888
A typhoon crossed the Visayas; in the China Sea, it inclined to the N and later to the NNE, passing across Batanes, and continued towards Japan
u
t
16-21
October
1888
A depression moved over Visayas; in the China Sea it developed into a typhoon
y
t
1-8
September
1888
The typhoon appeared E of Luzon and in a NW direction crossed S Formosa and entered the Continent near Amoy. Probably a branch of this typhoon crossed S of Luzon and developed greater intensity in the China Sea SW of Manila
u
t
7-12
September
1888
A typhoon developed in the China Sea SW of Manila and moved WNW towards the Gulf of Tongking
u
t
24-30
September
1888
A typhoon appeared SE of Manila in the Pacific and moved NW, coming very near to NE and N of Luzon; it inclined to WNW and WSW in the China Sea and moved S of Hainan
u
t
1-5
August
1888
A typhoon raged in the Pacific to the E and NE of Manila; it recurved towards NW and W, entering the China coast S of Shanghai
u
t
14-18
August
1888
A typhoon in the Pacific to the NE and N of Luzon, moved NW towards Formosa Island. A terrific tornado destroyed the town of Oton, Panay; it developed into a depression which moved to NW
u
t
23-31
August
1888
A typhoon to the E and NE of Luzon, moved to NNW, recurved slowly to NE and crossed eastern Japan
u
t
12-16
July
1888
A typhoon of the Pacific moved to NW, inclined more to W by N towards the China coast NE of Hongkong.
u
t
19-22
July
1888
A typhoon moved NE China Sea, W of Luzon, towards the Balintang Channel.
u
t
23-30
July
1888
A distant typhoon moved in the Pacific to the NE of Luzon. It recurved slowly to NNE, towards SW Japan.
u
t
6-10
June
1889
A distant typhoon raged in the Pacific NE of Luzon and recurved to NE.
u
t
9-10
December
1889
A typhoon of low latitudes probably moved W towards the China Sea
u
t
1-7
November
1889
Moving from E to SE Luzon in a E-W direction, the typhoon crossed SE Luzon, then N Mindoro, and continued on its course in the China Sea, towards the Tongking Gulf
u
t
29-Dec 5
November
1889
A typhoon or depression appeared towards the SE of Luzon and it recurved to N and NE
u
t
11-13
October
1889
A typhoon, raging to the E and NE of Luzon in the Pacific, recurved to N and NE
u
t
19-23
October
1889
A typhoon crossed Visayas; in the China Sea, it recurved to NW and later on again to WNW towards S of Hainan.
u
t
8-12
September
1889
A distant typhoon appeared in the Pacific to the NE of Luzon, recurved to N and NNE and crossed eastern Japan
u
t
22-25
September
1889
A typhoon developed in the China Sea, W of Luzon, and moved to WNW towards Hainan
u
t
1-3
August
1889
A typhoon or depression in the China Sea NW of Luzon, moved N towards the Formosa Channel
u
t
12-16
August
1889
A typhoon developed in the China Sea, off NW Luzon, moving WNW; it reached the S China coast, NE of Hainan Strait
u
t
18-23
August
1889
A typhoon appeared in the Pacific, moving NNW, and inclined later to NW towards the China coast, S of Ningpo
u
t
14-17
July
1889
A typhoon in the Pacific to the NE of Luzon moved WSW; it approached NW Luzon and continued westward to S Hainan and Tongking Gulf.
u
t
25-28
July
1889
A typhoon appeared near the NW end of Luzon; it moved to WNW and entered the S China coast SW of Hongkong.
u
t
July 28- August 1
JulyandAugust
1889
A distant typhoon to the N of Luzon moved to NW, crossed Formosa Island, and entered the Continent near Amoy.
u
t
12-17
October
1889
A typhoon appeared in the China Sea NW of Luzon, movef to WNW and entered the Continent NE of Hongkong
u
t
27-1
October-November
1889
Appearing E of meridian 130ºE, and moving in a direction nearly E-W, the typhoon crossed the SE and S parts of Luzon and then continued into de China Sea, W of meridian 110º E
u
t
1-5
January
1890
A depression originated far away to the East of Mindanao and moving westwards or west-northwestwards, crossed the northern part of this island. Afterwards it inclined slightly to WSW and reached the China Sea across southern Palawan.
u
s
April 27- May 4
AprilandMay
1890
A depression moved from the vicinity of Yap through Leyte, North Cebu, Panay and South Mindoro to the China Sea, where it inclined to NW and seemingly reached the Continent some distance west of Macao.
u
s
3-7
June
1890
A distant depression was located to the ENE of Luzon; it recurved to ENE touching S and SE of Japan.
u
s
12-16
June
1890
The typhoon was not severe, while crossing Visayas, but it deepened in the China Sea and reached the Gulf of Tongking.
u
t
24-26
June
1890
A distant typhoon was noticed to the NE of Luzon; it recurved to N and NE, east of Formosa towards SW of Japan.
u
t
25-29
June
1890
A depression moved from W of Luzon westwards to Hainan Channel and TongKing Gulf.
u
s
7-13
November
1890
A typhoon appeared WSW of Yap and moved to WNW. It crossed the provinces of Albay, Camarines, Tayabas, Bulacan, Bataan, and Zambales, toward the China Sea. The barometric minimum at Tabaco was 742.85 mm. and 741.9 mm. on board the steamship Mount Hebron, in a position very close to 119º E and 16º N.
u
t
30-2-Dec.
November
1890
The first indications (possibly a depression) appeared off the E of Marianas, then the typhoon advanced in a NW direction to a position above parallel 20ºN, where it recurved to NE.
u
t
1-6
October
1890
A very distant typhoon appeared to the NE of Luzon, moving to NW; after recurving NNE, it reached SW Japan.
u
t
7-14
October
1890
A typhoon appeared E of southern Luzon moving towards the NW. At the NE sector of Luzon it changed its course recurving well to W and finally it crossed Hainan.
u
t
17-23
October
1890
A typhoon apparently formed between Masbate and Samar. First it moved to NW, then it recurved to N and NE while crossing San Miguel Bay, Camarines, and, finally, approached NE Japan.
u
t
30-2
October-November
1890
The first indication of this typhoon appeared off the E of the Marianas, then the storm advanced in a NW direction to a position above paralle 20º where it recurved to the NE
u
t
1-8
September
1890
A distant typhoon to the E of Luzon which moved first towards NNW and later towards NNW, passing to the E of Hondo and of Yezo
u
t
3-8
September
1890
A typhoon which appeared ENE of north Luzon and moved to W and W by S through Babuyanes towards Hainan
u
t
5-12
September
1890
A distant typhoon appeared E of Luzon and moved first to NNW but inclining to NNE and ENE it crossed Kiushiu, Shikoku and finally recurving to N, crossed Honde W of Kobe
u
t
10-18
September
1890
A distant typhoon E of north Luzon which moved to NNE and crossed Hondo near Kobe; in the Japan Sea, recurved to NE and crossed again N Hondo
u
t
20-25
September
1890
A distant typhoon to the NE of Luzon, moved NNE and later to NE through S Kiushiu, S Shikoku and SE Honde towards the Pacific
u
t
21-23
September
1890
A depression formed W of Mindoro and moved to WNW
u
s
28-3
September-October
1890
A typhoon appeared ENE of Samar and continued to WNW through N Catanduanes, Polillo and the provinces of Nueva Ecija, Tarlac and Zambales on the China Sea and the island of Hainan. The barometric minimum was 738.05 mm at Cabanatuan, 745.26 mm at Sual, Pangasinan and 746.4 mm at Tabaco, Albay. The damage done in Manila and its surroundings was considerable
u
t
13-17
July
1890
The typhoon appeared to the E of Luzon moving to NW, it crossed Formosa and entered the Continent near Foochow.
u
t
July 28- August 2
JulyandAugust
1890
A typhoon moved from E of southern Luzon to NW and recurving successvily to N and NE, it passed very close to South Japan.
u
t
19-22
October
1890
A depression formed near Masbate and moved first to W. In the China Sea, it deepened and inclined to WNW continuing its course towards the Tongking Gulf
u
s
7-13
January
1891
A depression, apparently from the southern part of Mindoro Sea, went westwards to Siam and Bangkok developing as it proceeded.
u
s
7-13
January
1891
A typhoon from parallel 6º N, East of southern Mindanao, crossed Davao, Cotabato, Zamboanga and Palawan, recurved near Paracels to the NE and passed into the Pacific through the Bashi Channel.
u
t
15-16
March
1891
A depression from Paracels went to Formosa Styrait.
u
s
24-27
March
1891
A small depression crossed central Luzon from Nueva Ecija to Zambales, filling up as it proceeded.
u
s
1-6
April
1891
A distant depression from East of southern Luzon went NW and recurving east of, but far away from, Batanes and Formosa, was felt off south Japan in its course to the NE.
u
s
26-30
April
1891
A depression,starting from the vicinity of the Carolines and Guam and moving WNW, recurved the Pacific to the NE without approching Luzon.
u
s
28-29
June
1891
A depression, S of Panay and Negros, strongly increased the northern winds which were accompained with much rain.
u
s
20-24
December
1891
A typhoon came from N of Palau in a WNW direction and crossed S Leyte, N Cebu, N Panay and S Mindoro, continuing towards the Tongking Gulf
u
t
3-14
May
1891
A typhoon from paralell 6ºN, E of southern Mindanao, crossed Davao, Cotabato, N Zamboanga and Palawan, recurved near Paracels to the NE and passed into the Pacific through the Bashi Channel.
u
t
20-22
May
1891
A depression formed in central or western Visayas and proceeded in a WNW direction to the China Sea.
u
s
11-15
November
1891
A typhoon appeared NE of Samar and, in a WNW direction, crossed southern Luzon from Sorsogon province to Batangas province. (2) 12-16: A typhoon appeared NE of Samar, crossed SE Luzon and N Mindoro, and then continued in the same E-W direction far out in the China Sea. Much destruction in Luzon, S and SE provinces and N Mindoro. (3) 14-19: A typhoon appeared ENE of Samar and in a WNW direction, crossed N Samar and southern Luzon from Sorsogon province to Batangas province, continued in the China Sea to S of Hainan. Barometric minimum in Gubat was 721.0 mm.
u
t
19-24
November
1891
A typhoon appeared for out in the Pacific Ocean, NE of Luzon, and recurving off E Formosa, reached SE and E Japan
u
t
3-10
October
1891
A very distant typhoon was formed to the N of Marianas with direction NNW; after recurving to NNE it approached SE Japan and continued towards the Aleutian Islands where te steamship Empress of Asia felt it.
u
t
15-18
October
1891
A small typhoon or depression appeared near SE of Luzon, passed through Camarines Norte in a WSW direction and apparently filled up S of Manila.
u
s
27-28
October
1891
A typhoon passed over N of Guam in a SE-NW direction. The barometric minimum at Guam was 736.0 mm.
u
t
3-9
September
1891
The typhoon moved from E of Luzon in a NW direction and recurved to the NE, east of Formosa, on its way to the Korea Strait
u
t
9-16
September
1891
Appearing NE of Luzon, the typhoon, moving in a WNW direction, approached S Formosa and recurved to the NE; then it followed the coast of Japan bordering the Japan Sea and finally crossed Hokkaido to the ENE
u
t
10-13
September
1891
From W of north Luzon, the typhoon moved constantly westwards and reached Hainan
u
t
15-17
September
1891
The typhoon appeared SW of Manila and went to Annam
u
t
15-24
September
1891
The typhoon appeared far away to the E of Luzon and, in a NNW direction or recurving off E Formosa, approached SW Japan where it crossed the island, moving towards the NE
u
t
19-25
September
1891
The typhoon appeared E of Northern Luzon and in a WNW direction, went to the Continent, near Swatow; it recurved to ENE and N in the Eastern Sea. The barometric minimum at Aparri was 745.8 mm.
u
t
6-16
August
1891
Starting from NE of Palaos, the typhoon advanced to the NW, recurved SE of Formosa to a NNE direction and crossed SE Japan
u
t
16-22
August
1891
Appearing NE of Luzon, the typhoon approached S Formosa and recurved to the NE
u
t
18-26
August
1891
The typhoon appeared E, and crossed the NE end of Luzon; then, following a NW direction, it entered the coast of China
u
t
27-4
August-September
1891
The typhoon proceeded from N of Palaos in a NW direction, approached NE Luzon, recurved to the N, passing near Shanghai, and continued towards the NE to Korea and the Japan Sea
u
t
8-13
July
1891
There was a depression which crossed northern Visayas and though not much developed, reached the China Sea through Mindoro, from which it moved in a nearly E-W direction to Annam.
u
s
13-19
July
1891
A typhoon passed N of Yap on the 14th, moving in a NW direction, and came close to NE Luzon; then it inclined to WNW towards the Continent W of Hongkong. The barometric minimun on the steamship Don Juan near Pratas was 724.0 mm.
u
t
25-27
July
1891
The typhoon appeared E of Luzon and crossed the Provinces of Bulacan, Pampanga and Zambales on its way to the China Sea
u
t
July 27- August 4
JulyandAugust
1891
A distant typhoon which from E of S Luzon moved NNW and recurving E of Formosa to NE continued towards the Japan Sea through the Korea Strait.
u
t
July 30- August 2
JulyandAugust
1891
A depression moved from E of Paracels in the China Sea to the Continent near Swatow.
u
s
11-14
January
1892
A depression from the SE of Palau, crossed Mindanao where it was not well developed and then proceeded towards the China Sea through the Sulu Sea, moving nearly E-W.
u
s
12-14
January
1892
A typhoon moved from SE of Palau to NW and probably recurved off East Luzon to NE.
u
t
8-11
June
1892
A typhoon that travelled in the Pacific Ocean at considerable distance, E to NE of the Archipielago, recurved slowly to N and NE and crossed Japan from near Nagasaki to N of Tokio
u
t
24-27
June
1892
A small typhoon apparently formed near Masbate moved to NNW through Isla Verde passage and towards the China Sea.
u
t
1-8
December
1892
Starting from S of Palau, the typhoon proceeded in a NW by W direction and passed some distance off S of Davao; continuing through north of Suluit crossed the Balabac Strait into the China Sea towards Conchinchina
u
t
30-2
December-January
1892
This typhoon gave frist indications of its existence when far off SE of Guam, moving in NW direction. It advanced towards S and SW of Guam where it recurved to NNW and N very near this island
u
t
8-17
November
1892
A typhoon starting from SSE of Palau and moving in a NW by W direction, crossed S Mindanao through the provinces of Davao, Cotabato and Zamboanga and afterwards passed S Palawan on its way to the Continent N of Conchinchina
u
t
14-20
November
1892
A small typhoon appeared S of Cebu Island and moved NW by W through Negron and Palawan, finally reaching Annam fully developed
u
t
17-24
November
1892
A typhoon appeared far of E of Visayas and recurved E of Luzon to the NE, without approaching very close to the Archipielago
u
t
4-13
October
1892
A typhoon started near Guam and moved to the vicinity of NE Luzon, where it began to recurve around the Batanes to NNW and N. It crossed eastern Formosa and inclining to NE, entered W Japan N of Nagasaki and continued through Hondo and Yezo.
u
t
21-30
October
1892
A typhoon appeared in the Pacific ocean near Guam. Moving nearly westwards, it entered Nueva Vizcaya in a WNW direction and recurved in the Mountain Province to the N and ENE., emerging inte the Pacific throgh the Cagayan Province.
u
t
3-11
September
1892
A typhoon moved from E of Northern Formosa in a WSW and SW direction, passed S of Taihoku and disappeared S of Hainan in the China Sea
u
t
11-19
September
1892
This typhoon came from E of northern Luzon moving WNW, crossed very near S Formosa, and, inclining to W, passed very near N of Hongkong
u
t
22-26
September
1892
Luzon was probably traversed by a depression which developed into a typhoon in the China Sea and recurved W of northern Luzon to NE, approaching S Formosa
u
t
10-30 19-30
August
1892
Coming from S of Palaos this typhoon crossed Mindanao from Baganga to Dapitan, proceeded to N Palawan and, inclining in the China Sea more to the NW, reached the Continent N of Hainan. (2) Coming from S of Palaos this typhoon crossed Mindanao from Baganga to Dapitan, proceeded to N Palawan and, inclining more to the NW, reached the Continent N of Hainan
u
t
14-18
August
1892
Coming from E of central Luzon this typhoon moved in a direction nearly NW and recurving to the W, crossed E Formosa on its way to the Continent S of Foochow
u
t
18-22
July
1892
A typhoon formed either W of Luzon or S Hongkong and moved to NNE towards the Formosa Channel where it recurved to ESE crossing S Formosa
u
t
20-25
July
1892
A distant typhoon formed in the Pacific Ocean moved WNW towards Bashi Channel and Formosa.
u
t
20-28
July
1892
A typhoon moved from N of Mariana Islands towards Loochoos: it recurved SW of Japan to NE and crossed S Korea, N Hondo and SE Yezo.
u
t
July 25 - August 2
JulyandAugust
1892
A distant typhoon to NE of Luzon and apparently coming from the vicinity of Marianas in a WNW direction passed near Batanes and recurved to N while SSE of Hongkong to enter the Continent very near E of that colony.
u
t
27-30
July
1892
There was a distant typhoon E and NE of Luzon
u
t
5-7
June
1893
A depression appeared ESE of Davao and moving WNW passed N of Sulu towards the China sea.
u
s
9-15
June
1893
A typhoon appeared E of north Luzon and moved nearly to N; inclining lightly to NNE, it approached the E China coast at Ningpo and proceeded to N and NNE towards Korea Bay.
u
t
10-15
June
1893
A depression, which probably formed in the Sulu sea, moves across Palawan and further NW to a point SE of Macclesfield Banks.
u
s
13-19
June
1893
A depression formed E of Mindoro sea, moved to NW and developing in the China Sea reached Tongking south and near Haipong.
u
s
11-13
January
1893
A depression, coming from Sof Sanguir Island, moved to NW, across Basilan and southern Palawan.
u
s
11-17
January
1893
A depression appeared off east Mindanao and in WNW direction crossed Surigao, Dinagat, Leyte, Cebu, Northern Negros, Panay and continued through Calamianes, inclining to W and WSW in the China Sea.
u
s
8-16
March
1893
A typhoon appeared east of Samar and split into two branches; one moved to the W, across northern Visayas towards the China Sea, while the main center started northwards into the Pacific.
u
s
10-16
March
1893
A depression from the Pacific crossed south of Visayan islands and moved towards the China Sea. At the same time, a second depression was progressing NW and N in the Pacific Ocean along the coast of Luzon.
u
s
1-14
June
1893
A typhoon started in the China sea W of Luzon and moved westward to the Tongking Gulf and the Continent; it seems to have recurved to N and NE and appeared later W of Shanghai; inclining to ENE, it reached S Korea and finally crossed Eastern Hondo.
u
t
2-8
December
1893
Moving from SE of Guam in an E-W direction towards the Visayas, the typhoon proceeded through the Surigao Strait to Palawan and continued in the China Sea to the Continent near Conchinchina
u
t
21-23, 25-28, 29-31
December
1893
On these days there were three small depressions, which ran through S Visayas towards the China Sea without developing
u
s
6-12
May
1893
Appearing East of southern Leyte and moving in a NW direction, the typhoon crossed Leyte, northern Cebu and Mindoro, then increased its intensity in the China Sea and finally reached the Tongking Gulf.
u
t
10-12
May
1893
Moving from Western Carolines, the typhoon reached the Archipiélago N of Samar, crossed NW Masbate and inclininig to NW continued through Tabayas, Laguna, Bulacan, Pampanga, Tarlac and Pangasinan to the Lingayen Gulf; in the China Sea it recurved to N and NE and crossed Batanes; continuing along Loochoos, E Shikoku and through Hondo, it passed near Osaka and Kioto.
u
t
10-13
November
1893
A small typhoon moved through S Cebu, Negros and Panay in the direction towards S Mindoro and the China Sea
u
t
20-24
November
1893
Appearing NE of Samar, the typhoon crossed Sorsogon and Mindoro in an E-W direction, which was retained in the China Sea
u
t
6-13
October
1893
The typhoon appeared far off E of Samar, at first moving in a WNW direction but soon it recurved to the N and NNE as it passed E of Luzon, and later inclining to NE, approached SW Japan and crossed Hondo, W of Kobe.
u
t
23-28
October
1893
A typhoon moved from S of Negros to NW towards the Tongking Gulf.
u
t
5-8
September
1893
Appearing E of Northern Luzon and moving WNW, the typhoon crossed Babuyan Islands and arrived at the Continent, north of, and close to, Hongkong where it caused considerable damage
u
t
10-12
September
1893
Moving in a NW direction from E of northern Luzon, the typhoon crossed S Formosa on its way towards Amoy. Minimum pressure at Aparri was 746.5 mm; at South Cape, Formosa, was 717.28 mm.
u
t
17-24
September
1893
Appearing E of northern Luzon and moving in a NW direction, the typhoon crossed Formosa, entered the Continent N of Foochow, apparently it split into two branches one of which continued to NE towards the Korea Strait
u
t
20-24
September
1893
A depression appeared SSW of Manila and developed into a typhoon as it moved to the NW, finally entering the Continent N of Hainan
u
t
20-27
September
1893
From N of the Western Carolines, the typhoon entered Luzon and crossed the provinces of Isbela and Ilocos Sur, finally reaching the Continent NE of Hainan
u
t
25-29
September
1893
A typhoon appeared E of Luzon moving WNW, it crossed without doing much damage, the provinces of Isabela and Ilocos, towards the China Sea where it inclined slightly to W and passed north of Hainan Strait towards the Tongking Gulf
u
t
28-3
September-October
1893
Moving from the N of the Western Carolines in a WNW direction, the typhoon crossed Luzon through Isabela, Cagayan and Ilocos provinces, inflicting very severe damage as it passed. Then inclining more to the NW, it finally reached the Continent NE of Hainan. The barometric minimum at Cabagan Viejo was 705.0 mm, at Tuguegarao 711.50 mm, at Ilagan was 708.0 mm and at Hongkong 743.26 mm
u
t
29-8
September-October
1893
Starting from near Central Carolines and moving in a WNW direction, the typhoon advanced as far as E of southern Formosa, where it inclined to WSW, crossed Bashi Channel and reached the Continent N of Hainan
u
t
7-11
August
1893
The typhoon appeared E of northern Mindanao and, moving in a NW direction, reached E of northern Formosa, where it recurved to the NE and proceeded along the southern part of Japan; then it finally crossed Hondo Island W of Tokio and entered in the Japan Sea
u
t
7-12
August
1893
A typhoon appeared E of N Luzon and moving to NNW reached the E China coast at Ningpo and inclined more to NW
u
t
11-19
August
1893
A typhoon appeared E of Luzon, recurved to N, reached Oshima and SW Japan and inclining to NE, crossed Hondo near Osaka
u
t
17-20
August
1893
A small typhoon, formed apparently in the Celebes Sea, moved to the NW through NE of Borneo and Balabac Strait towards the China Sea and reached the Tongkin Gulf
u
t
23-26
August
1893
A depression appeared SW of Manila in the China Sea and taking a WNW direction, moved to the Tongkin Gulf
u
t
29-3
August-September
1893
The typhoon appeared E of S Luzon in the Pacific Ocean, it recurved to NNW advancing in latitude and finally recurved to NNE towards the Japan Sea through Korea
u
t
15-19
July
1893
Appearing E of Luzon as it moved WNW, it crossed Cagayan and Ilocos; when in the China Sea, it inclined more to the N, crossed S Formosa moving to NE to the Yellow Sea N of Shanghai and crossed N Korea in the direction to the Japan Sea.
u
t
24-30
October
1893
A distant depression or typhoon, coming from very low latitudes to the SSE of Mindanao, moved first in a NE direction which changed to NNE and finaly approached southeastern Japan
u
t
4-18
June
1894
A typhoon, which started from a point E of Davao, crossed Davao, Cotabato and Zamboanga. It then changed its direction to WNW, crossed Palawan and continued to Hainan and northern Tongking.
u
t
19-28
June
1894
Beginning at a point ESE of western Carolines, a typhoon advanced in a direction nearly E-W and recurved to NW off Surigao Strait. Then it moved along the eastern coast of the Visayas and Luzon and, when it reached the NE end of this island, it recurved to the NE at a point east of Batanes.
u
t
22-25
June
1894
A typhoon formed W of northern Luzon and went in a WNW direction to Hainan Strait.
u
t
June 26- July 5
JuneandJuly
1894
A typhoon formed in the China sea W of northen Luzon, advanced northwards, recurved to the NE and followed the Formosa Channel. Then it entered the continent, moving NNW, recurved again to the NE, reached Korea and continued its course across the Japan Sea to S Hakodate.
u
t
3-9
January
1894
A depression developed around the Western Carolines and moving almost west, crossed Mindanao and entered Indo-China.
u
s
4-7
February
1894
An extended depression developed to the SW of Mindanao and moved across the Sulu Sea and Palawan towards the Gulf of Tongking.
u
s
12-14
February
1894
An extended depression moved from the Carolines to Mindanao and Palawan and after crossing the China Sea entered Indo-China.
u
s
1-9 7-12
March
1894
Beginning near Palau and moving in a direction nearly E-W, the typhoon crossed southern Mindanao and continued, with some inclination to the WNW, its course into the china Sea. (2) From a point near Palau, the typhoon, moving in a E-W direction, crossed Mindanao, the Sulu Sea, and inclining to WNW, reached Annam.
u
t
14-20
March
1894
From ESE of Palau moving in a direction E-W or ENE-WSW, the typhonn crossed central Mindanao without deepening and continued into the China Sea through southern Palawan reaching southern Conchinchina.
u
s
5-13
April
1894
A depression appeared ESE of Davao and, crossing south of Mindanao, the Celebes Sea and north Borneo, continued its course into the China Sea to Conchinchina, towards the Siam Gulf and to the Malay Peninsula.
u
s
16-23
December
1894
Starting from a point ENE of Palau, a depression continued to Davao, passed between Zamboanga and Basilan and proceeded to the China Sea through the Balabac Pass
u
s
11-17
January
1894
A depression crossed southern Mindanao in an E-W direction, passed very near north Borneo and inclining WNW, entered Indo-China
u
s
8-14
May
1894
Fron central Visayas, a depression went WNW to S Annam, recurved in the interior and reached Korea and Japan.
u
s
5-16 9-21
May
1894
Starting from a point WNW of the Carolines, the typhoon moved in a NW direction, recurved to the NE when it was close to the eastern part of Bashi Channnel and reached the southeastern part of Japan. (2) Starting from a point N of Palau, the typhoon moved towards the NW, then later on changed to NNW and recurved when it was close to the Bashi Channel
u
t
May 26-June 11
MayandJune
1894
A typhoon from E of Visayas, crossed the archipielago from Albany to N Mindoro, and inclining to the NW, reached the point NE of Hainan. There, it recurved to the NE and continued its course through the Continent, and after passing far W and N of Shangai, crossed S Korea and finally Yezo, Japan.
u
t
2-5
November
1894
A depression in the Pacific Ocean formed midway between Luzon and Guam and moved towards the NNE
u
s
3-12
November
1894
A typhoon from SE of the Western Carolines, moved NNW and then changed to NNE, passing off E of Japan. (2) 5-12: From W of southern Negros, a depression moving towards the W, crossed S Palawan and, after recurving in the China Sea to the N and the E, it filled up W of Calamianes. (3) 8-11: A typhoon started from W of Guam, moved WNW, crossed northern Luzon and filled up in the China Sea after recurving to the N. Barometric minimum at Aparri was 730.3 mm. and the barometer of the steamship Atlantic near meridian 131º E and 16º N fell 34.5 mm. in eight hours, the steamer being in the greatest danger from the violence of the typhoon; in Luzon it has lost much of its force.
u
t
27-11
November-December
1894
A typhoon appeared ESE of the Western Carolines, moved WNW, and recurved to the NNE, towards E Japan
u
t
4-12 7-11
October
1894
A typhoon or depression moved from WNW of the Western Carolines in an E-W direction, crossed the Archipielago from S Samar through N Leyte, Romblon and Mindoro and passed into the China Sea, keeping its course in a WNW direction towards N Annam.
u
t
12-20
October
1894
A typhoon from NW of the Western Carolines moved NNW and recurved to the NE without approaching out Archipielago
u
t
18-22
October
1894
From a point near the southwest coast of Leyte, a depression moved WSW to S Palawan and the China Sea
u
s
7-12
September
1894
A typhoon went from the W of Bolinao to Hainan in a WNW direction
u
t
15-18
September
1894
A typhoon, from a point E of northern Mindanao, moved in a WNW direction and entered Luzon through Nueva Ecija. In the oriental cordillera, it divided itself into two branches. One branch went W to Zambales. The other went NNW to Pangasinan and La Union, after which it changed its direction to WNW and reached the Continent N of Hainan. The first branch was filling up during its movement in the China Sea, but joined the other branch before it was entirely filled up. The barometric minimum at San Isidro before dividing was 736.8 mm. The barometric minimum of the north branch at San Fernando was 737.15 mm and at Bolinao, second branch, was 740.0 mm. The damage was considerable.
u
t
16-25
September
1894
After crossing N Marianas, the typhoon took a WSW direction and, when half way between Marianas and Luzon, it inclined to the WNW. Then it passed through Balintang Channel and continued to the southern coast of China, near Canton. The barometric minimum at Macao was 742.4 mm. Much damage at Hongkong and Macao; more than 2000 victims.
u
t
22-29
September
1894
A typhoon crossed north of Western Carolines in an E-W direction. On approaching S Samar, it inclined to the NW. Passed over Luzon through the provinces of Nueva Ecija, Tarlac and Pangasinan and continued with the same direction, to the coast of China, north of Hainan.
u
t
30-6
September-October
1894
A typhoon appeared E of Manila, crossed central Luzon in a nearly E-W direction, inclining afterwards to the NW and finally to the NNE when it was near Hongkong. The barometric minimum at San Fernando, Union, was 740.2 mm.
u
t
1-12
August
1894
A typhoon formed very far E of Luzon; moved WNW but soon recurved to N and NE and crossed Japan and SE Yezo. The barometric minimum at Hamamatsu was 728.2 mm, and at Nemuro, 743.7 mm
u
t
1-12
August
1894
Starting from NW of N Carolines, the typhoon moved towards the NW, recurved to the NE and NNE when it was E of Northern Luzon and finally crossed E Japan and S Hakodate in its further inclination to the E
u
t
26-31
August
1894
A typhoon formed W of N Luzon which moved to the Continent N of Hainan
u
t
4-8
July
1894
Starting from W of Leyte, this depression crossed N Cebu, Panay and the Southern part of Calamianes. After reaching S Hainan, it recurved to NNW and entered the Continent.
u
s
7-14
July
1894
A typhoon started from WNW of Bolinao and went in a NE direction to the Continent NE of Hainan.
u
t
16-25
July
1894
Beginning from a point WNW of the western Carolines, a typhoon moved to the NW, recurved E of the Batanes and Formosa to a direction NNE, which later changed to NE and then crossed Japan from Nagasaki to the district north of Tokio.
u
t
18-21
July
1894
A typhoon from a point W of Bolinao moved in a WNW direction to the Continent N of Hainan
u
t
19-28
July
1894
Starting from a point E of Surigao Strait, the typhoon went NNW, recurved far off to the E of Formosa and proceeded to SE Korea.
u
t
22-26
July
1894
Starting from W of northwestern Luzon, a typhoon moved WNW to the Continent N of Hainan.
u
t

JulyandAugust
1894
This typhoon started from a point halfway between the Visayas and the western Carolines. At first it moved towards the WNW, then it changed to the N when it was east of Luzon, and again to WNW while off the south of Formosa. Finally after inclining again to NW, it moved WNW, passed some distance N of Formosa and entered the Continent N of Foochow.
u
t
7-12
October
1894
A typhoon appeared E of the Marianes, advanced in a NW direction, crossed the northern Marianas and recurved slowly above 22º N parallel to a NE direction
u
t
7-11
October
1894
From NE of Guam, a distant typhoon crossed N Mariaas in a NNW direction and recurved slowly to the NE.
u
t
23-28
October
1894
Starting from ESE of Palau, a depression reached Mindanao, crossed Davao, Cotabato and the Zamboanga peninsula and continued to the China Sea across S Palawan
u
s
4-12
June
1895
A typhoon from E of Palau, crossed as it moved in a WNW direction, S Samar, N Leyte, Romblon and S Mindoro. In the China Sea, it inclined to the NW and continued towards the Tongking Gulf.
u
t
16-18
June
1895
A small typhoon formed E of Mindoro and crossed this island in its course towards the China Sea.
u
s
16-27
June
1895
From W of Yap, a typhoon advanced northwestwards and recurving to NE near the eastern part of Formosa, it reached southern Japan.
u
t
June 22- July 3
JuneandJuly
1895
This typhoon from ESE of Yap moved to NW, recurved some distance of NE Luzon to N and NE and continued towards Japan.
u
t
23-25
June
1895
A depression formed W of north Luzon and moving in a NNW direction it entered the Continent between Amoy and Swatow.
u
s
16-26 17-26
January
1895
A typhoon appeared far away east western Carolines, advanced along parallel 9º N and passed over Yap with fearful fury of the wind and extraordinarily montainous sea. Inclining to WSW it continued through Surigao, southern Negros and Palawan to the China Sea. Yap was totally destroyed. The barometric minimun at Yap was 729,4 mm. (2) A typhoon starting from Eastern Carolines, moving along the parallel 10º N and crossed Surigao, southern Negros and Palawan on its way to the China Sea.
u
t
January 25-4February 4
JanuaryandFebruary
1895
A depression from south of Guam advanced westwards and crossed Visayas; in the China Sea it increased in intensity and recurved to the NW towards the Continent north of Hainan.
u
s
2-10
February
1895
A depression formed SSE of Guam and advanced to NW and NNW. On reaching the Korea Strait it continued along the Japan Sea towards NE.
u
s
2-5
March
1895
A depression from the E entered through th Surigao Strait and spread considerably N of Mindanao.
u
s
13-18
December
1895
Two depressions moved along parallels 5º,77ºN and passed through S Mindanao in the form of two low-pressure areas
u
s
8-17
May
1895
A typhoon from NE of Palau, in a WNW direction, reached Visayas and crossed S Samar, N Leyte, N Panay and S Mindoro; in the China sea it recurved to N and NE and crossed Luzon through Zambales, Pampanga and Nueva Ecija towards the Pacific. The steamship Gravina was wrecked near Capones with loss of many lives. The havoc wrought in Zambales was great.
u
t
5-15
November
1895
The typhoon appeared E of Leyte and then, slightly inclined to WNW, it crossed S Samar, N Leyte, N Panay and Calamianes on its way towards Tongking Gulf. (2) 7-14: A typhoon formed SSW of Guam, moved in a NW direction and recurved to NNE, passing finally near SE Japan
u
t
13-21
November
1895
This typhoon appeared SE of Guam and moving to NNW, passed N of Marianas; recurving NE, it approached near SE Japan. (2) 18-22: A typhoon appeared at a great distance ESE of Guam, passed very close to the S coast of this island as it moved in a WNW direction and probably filled up WNW of Guam in meridian 140º E. The barometric minimum at Guam was 730.6 mm.
u
t
7-9
October
1895
A typhoon appeared E of Guam moving to NW and passed N of the Island; its further track is unknown
u
t
28-2
October-November
1895
Moving from the Pacific Ocean, WSW of Guam, the typhoon crossed the northern part of Luzon and filled up after recurving near the 20th N parallel. The barometric minimum at Tuguegarao was 733.3 mm.
h
t
6-11
September
1895
This typhoon appeared SE of Yap and in a NW by W direction approached Luzon ESE of Manila, where either it filled up or crossed the Island in the form of a disintegrating depression
u
t
13-19
September
1895
The typhoon started from a point ENE of the Marianas and continuing to WNW, crossed S Formosa on its way to the Continent N of Swatow. The barometric minimum at Takow, Formosa, was 731.0 mm
u
t
19-30
September
1895
A typhoon appeared between Guam and Yap, moving in a NNW direction; it passed south of Nabha and recurving later to NE, it crossed N Kiushiu, entered the Japan Sea and finally inclining to the E, reached the Pacific across Yezo
u
t
23-27
September
1895
Beginning E of northern Luzon, the typhoon crossed S Formosa and recurved W and then SW towards the China Sea, passing near Swatow
u
t
13-25
August
1895
Two typhoons in very close succession affected the Archipielago; they appeared E of S Luzon, one moving towards NW and the other towards N; they recurved to N and NNE, respectively and crossing W Japan, proceeded to Japan Sea
u
t
24-26
August
1895
A typhoon appeared E of Guam and advancing to NW, passed N of the Marianas and later it seems to have recurved to N and NE without affecting Japan
u
t
25-31
August
1895
Starting from W of northern Luzon, the typhoon moved towards the NW and then towards WNW, finally reaching the Continent SW of Canton
u
t
28-9
August-September
1895
A typhoon, appearing some distance E of the southeastern part of Luzon, moved in a NW direction and recurved E of the Bashi Channel and Formosa to NE; following a NE direction along the Japan Sea but finally inclining to ENE, it reached the Pacific across Lagerouse Strait. The barometric reading at Kagishima on the 7th was 717.7 mm.
u
t
13-19
July
1895
A typhoon formed N of E Carolines and moved in a WNW direction; afterwards it recurved in the Pacific ENE of Manila towards NE
u
t
14-24
July
1895
A typhoon appeared ESE of Guam, moved to NW passing N of Marianas and recurved to ENE near Loochoos.
u
t
17-25
July
1895
A typhoon appeared far off E of Visayas and moved in a NW direction; it recurved to N and NNE some distance ENE of NE Luzon and inclining somewhat more to NE it crossed Kiushiu towards the Japan Sea; inclining to the E it continued through Central Hondo to the Pacific. The Barometric minimum at Nagasaki
u
t
22-29
July
1895
The typhoon started from S of Yap in parallel 7° N and moved to NE Luzon; it crossed in a WNW direction the northern most part of this Island and inclining somewhat to W in the China Sea it reached the Continent SW of Hongkong.
u
t
28-4
October-November
1895
From S of Guam, a typhoon in a NNW direction, passed W of Marianas and inclining to NNE, neared S Japan and continued to NE.
u
t
2-8
June
1896
From SW of western Carolines the typhoon moved in a WNW direction, crossed SE and S Luzon and then recurved in the China Sea to a NE direction and moved towards S Formosa.
u
t
14-16
June
1896
A depression formed in the Sulu Sea and moved to NW towards Paracels in the China sea.
u
s
6-20
May
1896
Appearing off E Mindanao and moving in a WNW direction, the typhoon crossed S Leyte, Cebu, Negros, S Panay and Calamianes. Then it recurved E of Macclesfield Bank to NE, passed over the NW end of Luzon and Babuyanes and entered W Japan in a N direction
u
t
1-2
October
1896
A rather shallow depression moved westward across south Visayas
u
s
19-20
October
1896
At the same time that a big typhoon was raging in the Pacific, a very small storm crossed N Luzon through Cagayan and Ilocos, causing some damage. The barometric minimum at Aparri was 742.65 mm.
h
s
1-12
September
1896
This typhoon moved from near W of Guam to W; inclining soon to NW and NNW, it approached SE of Kiushiu; inclined to NNE, it crossed Japan through Osaka province and in the Japan Sea, it recurved again to WNW
u
t
28-7
September-October
1896
Moving in a constant WNW direction from the N of Western Carolines, it crossed Luzon through Isabela and Ilocos and then passed over the China Sea towards Hainan. The barometric minimum on board the steamer Strathllan at about 112ºE and 23ºN was 726.4 mm
u
t
30-12
September-October
1896
A typhoon, moving from WSW of Guam, crossed Luzon through Cagayan and Ilocos Norte; in the China Sea, it recurved to NE near the Continent and filled up near Pescadores
u
t
6-10
August
1896
Appearing off NE of Samar, it passed through Luzon over the provinces of Nueva Vizcaya, Benguet and La Union, whence it continued to the Tongkin Gulf
u
t
18-22
August
1896
Appearing far SE of Guam, near 8º N latitude, it moved in a WNW direction to meridian 135ºE and parallel 20ºN, where it recurved to the NE
u
t
21-27
August
1896
NE Luzon felt the influence of two distant depressions developing in the Pacific to the E and NE
u
s
5-9
July
1896
Appearing off E coast of N Luzon, it crossed the Provinces of Cagayan and Ilocos N and in the same W by N direction, entered the Continent N of Hainan
u
t
17-26
July
1896
A depression appeared E of Yap, moved in a WNW direction and crossed Central Luzon, apparently filling up in the China Sea.
u
s
23-26
July
1896
From the W of N Luzon it moved to the Continent N of Hainan Strait.
u
t
24-30
July
1896
Moving from N of Western Carolines it crossed the NE end of Luzon, and, with the same WNW direction, entered the Continent SW of Canton. Much damage was done in Hongkong, Macao and Canton River. The barometric minimun at Hongkong was 733.3 mm.
u
t
July 29- August 4
JulyandAugust
1896
Moving from the SE of Yap in a WNW direction, it crossed NE Samar, SE and S Luzon and continued inclining to NW, reaching the Continent N of Hainan.
u
t
5-14
October
1896
Appearing E of north Marianas and advancing in an E-W direction just before reaching the Islands, the typhoon curved to NNW and disappeared near meridian 140º E longitude.
u
t
2-6
October
1896
A distant typhoon in the Pacific moved from W of Guam to NW and finally to NE.
u
t
15
June
1897
Luzon was under the influence of two simultaneous depressions, one in the Pacific to the NE and other in the China sea.
u
s
18
June
1897
Luzon was again under the influence of two depressions a little more developed than those of the 15; one in the China sea WSW and W of Manila and the second far to the NE of Luzon.
u
s
June 29- July 4
JuneandJuly
1897
A typhoon formed apparently in the China Sea W of Luzon and moved NW to the China sea coast near Swatow.
u
t
11-16
March
1897
A depression moved from S of Yap westwards, through south Visayas, to the china Sea.
u
s
5-7
May
1897
A distant depression moved in the Pacific and recurved to NE, while developing E of Luzon.
u
s
26-29
May
1897
A depression moved from E to W or WNW, across S Mindanao and Sulu.
u
s
9-16
November
1897
Moving from S of Palau in an E-W direction, the typhoon crossed Mindanao and N Palawan and then, after reaching SE of Hainan, it recurved to ENE and passed S of Formosa into de Pacific Ocean
u
t
26-30
November
1897
A depression from SE of Yap, moved WSW and recurved E of Samar to NE
u
s
2-8
October
1897
Moving from W of Ilocos the typhoon passed to the continent NE of Hainan and towards Tongking
u
t
7-16
October
1897
Moving from E of the Western Carolines in a direction near E-W, the typhoon crossed Samar and Leyte and then moved over S Mindoro towards the China Sea. The barometric minimum at Guiuan, Samar, was of 710.0 mm. It caused a tremendous wave which in S Samar and N Leyte destroyed completely several towns and claimed about 1500 human victims. It wrecked numerous boats within the Archipielago and put in great danger of foundering many others in the China Sea, where it inclined to NW.
h
t
20-24
October
1897
A depression appeared in the Pacific ESE of Manila and moving to NW either filled up or recurved to NE, off the E coast of Luzon, without touching the Archipielago.
u
s
28-7 28-7
October-November
1897
A typhoon appeared in the Pacific, SW of Guam, moving in a NNW direction; it recurved to the NE, while far E from Formosa
u
t
6-9
September
1897
A distant typhoon moved in the Pacific and while E of Loochoos it recurved to NE towards SE Japan
u
t
9-18
September
1897
This typhoon passed S of Guam moving to W by N; somewhat deformed, it crossed the central provinces N of Manila toward the China Sea where it developed greatly causing tremendous seas, which engulfed the steamer Taal near Fortun Island; it crossed the China Sea and reached the Hainan Strait. The barometric minimum at Haichow was 729.5 mm
u
t
18-19
September
1897
A small depression moved in an E-W direction from near NW Samar to S Mindoro
u
s
24-30 24-30
September
1897
A typhoon appeared E of Mindanao, near Palau, and moving in a NNW direction, it crossed Loochoos; it recurved to ENE Japan, and crossed along Kiushiu, Shikoku and S Hondo. (2) A typhoon appeared E of Mindanao, near Palau, moved in a NNW direction, crossed Loochoos and recurved to W Japan
u
t
1-11
August
1897
A typhoon moved from WSW of Guam, in a NW direction to near N of Formosa; it inclined to WNW and entered the Continent S of Wenchow and recurving to N and NE, it reached N Korea
u
t
3-7
August
1897
A typhoon appeared E of Visayas and crossed N Leyte and Panay and S of Mindoro, in the China Sea it inclined to NW
u
t
3-12
August
1897
A typhoon appeared N of Yap and moved to NW; it inclined to WNW, crossed S Loochoos and entered the Continent, where it recurved to N and NNE towards Korea
u
t
9-21
August
1897
A typhonn appeared NE of Luzon, moving to NW, passed near S Formosa and continued towards the China coast N of Amoy
u
t
4-6
July
1897
A depression apparently formed or developed in the Sulu Sea affected S of Mindoro and moved to the China Sea
u
s
21-27
July
1897
A typhoon coming from the Pacific in a NW direction came close to NE Luzon, probably just when it was recurving to NE
u
t
21-28
July
1897
A depression crossed from S Samar to S Mindoro and continued in a WNW direction towards the coast S of of Tongking Gulf
u
s
23-25
July
1897
A typhoon formed in the China Sea NW of Manila and moved to WNW towards the Continent N of Hainan Strait
u
t
24-26
July
1897
A small depression appeared between Bohol and Mindanao, moved westwards and finally inclined to SW in the Sulu Sea
u
s
28-2
July-August
1897
A typhoon moved from W of Guam to the Balintang Channel where it recurved to N and NE
u
t
3-7
October
1897
A rather shallow typhoon appeared NE of Luzon and recurved to NE while E of Formosa
u
t
13-19
October
1897
Starting from 140º E longitude, the typhoon crossed S of Palau, NE Mindanao, S Negros and N Palawan, continuing in the China Sea more inclined to the W
u
t
28-7
October-November
1897
Appearing in the Pacific E of Manila and moving in a NNW direction, the typhoon recurved to the NE, passed E of northern Formosa and crossed Loochoo Islands
u
t
May 28- June 5/May 28- June 6/May 28- June 6
MayandJune
1898
This typhoon appeared SE of Samar and moving in a NW direction, it approached to the NE of Samar and continued toward the E coast of Luzon. It crossed northern Luzon through Nueva Vizcaya, Benguet and La Union. In the China sea it continued to the N and NNE but later inclined to NNW and recurved to NE passing through S Formosa and Loochoos towards SE Japan. The barometric minimun at Laoang (N Samar) was 722,9 mm, at Albany was 741,6 mm and at Koshun (Formosa) was 631,7 mm. (2) It appeared E of Visayas, entered central Luzon by the Dingalan Bay and crossed Nueva Ecija and Pangasinan, recurving to the N as it approached the NW coast of Luzon, after which, inclined to the NNW and then to the NE, it crossed Formosa and E of Japan. (3) This typhoon appeared E of Visayas, entered Central Luzon by the Dingalen Bay and crossed Nueva Ecijja and Pangasinan, recurving to the N as it approached the NW coast of Luzon, after which, inclining to the NNW and then to the NE, it crossed Formosa and E Japan.
u
t
June 27- July 2
JuneandJuly
1898
A depression formed far W of north Luzon, moved to NW and reached the continent SW of Hongkong.
u
s
22-26
January
1898
A depression appeared east of Luzon and recurved at a distance towards NE approaching SE and E of Hondo, Japan.
u
s
23-26
January
1898
A depression crossed central Mindanao from E to W towards the Sulu and China Seas.
u
s
5-21
March
1898
A typhoon formed near Palau and moved to WNW crossing northeastern Mindanao, Southern Negros and N of Palawan. In the china Sea,recuved to the N and NE and crossed Luzon through Zambales, Tarlac and Nueva Vizcaya. In the Pacific it inclined to NNE and reached southern Japan.
u
t
12-14
December
1898
A typhoon or depression moved to NNW far of E Luzon and recurved while E of Bubayanes to NE.
u
s
5-17
November
1898
A typhoon crossed N of Manila in a WNW direction; in the China Sea, it recurved to N and NNE and continued across the Bashi Channel towards W Japan
u
t
19-23
November
1898
A typhoon appeared ESE of Manila and continued to NNW; it recurved to NE skirting the Loochoo Islands and later to ENE along S Japan
u
t
9-21
October
1898
Appearing far off E of Manila, it crossed Luzon through Isabela, Mountain and La Union provinces, recurved slowly in the China Sea, approached the SE coast of China and finally struck N Formosa where it filled up
u
s
23-28
October
1898
A typhoon appeared E of Luzon, crossed this island through Nueva Vizcaya and La Union; in the China Sea, it recurved to the NNW and filled up W of Balintang Channel
u
t
29-2
October-November
1898
This typhoon appeared ESE of Manila and crossed Luzon greatly deformed; it continued to NW, and afterwards recurved to N and NE towards S Formosa filling up
u
t
2-8
September
1898
A very distant typhoon coming from NW of Guam. Moved NW and later recurved to NNE, crossing East Hondo in the same direction
u
t
5-7
September
1898
A typhoon crossing far off ENE of Luzon and moving in a NNW direction, reached E of Loochoos where it recurved towards NE and crossed SE Japan
u
t
10-18
September
1898
Moving from NE of Western Carolines in a constant WNW direction, it crossed Luzon through Nueva Vizcaya and Ilocos Sur and reached Tongking through the Strait of Hainan
u
t
27-1 28-2
September-October
1898
Appearing in the Pacific E of, and far from, Luzon, it crossed central Formosa and entered the Continent. (2) A distant typhoon E of Luzon moved in a NW direction, crossed central Formosa and continued towards the Continent
u
t
2-11
August
1898
A typhoon from far off E of Luzon moved to N Formosa and entered the Continent where it recurved to N and NE towards N Korea
u
t
12-14
August
1898
A typhoon apparently formed in the China Sea SE of Hongkong and moving in a WNW direction, reached the Continent N of Hainan Strait
u
t
14-18
August
1898
A typhoon appeared ESE of N Luzon, crossed the northern most part of the Island in a WNW direction and reached the Continent between Hainan Strait and Canton
u
t
14-18
August
1898
Appearing to the E of northern Luzon, it crossed the northern end of the Island in a W by N direction, reaching the Continent near Canton
u
t
19-26
August
1898
A typhoon formed E of Luzon and moved NNE towards Formosa, east of this island it recurved to NE, crossed W Shikoku and recurved again to WNW towards N Kiushiu and finally to NNE in the Korea Strait
u
t
25-2
August-September
1898
A typhoon appeared SE of Loochoos moving to NW and recurved to W and WSW, towards the Continent near S Foochow where it divided apparently into two branches, one moved behind, the other towards NE, one reaching SW Japan on the 31st of August and the other on the 2nd of September
u
t
2-10
July
1898
A typhoon appeared far in the Pacific E of southeast Luzon and moving to NW it recurved E of Batanes to NNE; it crossed Kiushiu on its way towards the Japan Sea
u
t
12-14
July
1898
A typhoon appeared far to NE of Luzon and, moving to NW, crossed N Formosa and entered the Continent near Foochow
u
t
23-29
July
1898
A typhoon appeared E of SE Luzon, in a NW direction; it crossed central Luzon N of Manila and continued towards the Hainan Strait. The barometric minimum in Hainan was 742.0 mm
u
t
29-6
July-August
1898
A typhoon appeared E of north Luzon and moving to W by N, crossed the N end of this Island and continued in the China Sea towards S China Sea N of the Hainan Strait
u
t
27-29
June
1899
A distant typhoon developed ESE of Manila, but its effects were felt in Luzon, only when it recurved to the NE.
u
t
June 29- July 3
JuneandJuly
1899
This typhoon appeared W of Luzon and moving to WNW, it crossed Hainan and reached Haiphong in the Tongking Gulf.
u
t
23-28
April
1899
Appearing SE Guam below 9º N latitude, it moved in NW direction passed very near Guam by the west and inclined afterwards to NNW and N.
u
s
17-19
December
1899
A typhoon, not very strong, coming from the Pacific, passed between Visayas and Luzon, and continued westwards to the China Sea
u
t
18-28
May
1899
Coming from E of Visayas the typhoon crossed Samar, N Panay and N Calamianes, and after recurving in the China Sea, moved along Formosa Channel and then inclining to ENE crossed N Formosa towards Loochoos.
u
t
3-4
November
1899
A depression with small center crossed Visayas towards N Palayan
u
s
9-13
November
1899
A small typhoon crossed N Visayas through Samar and Leyte, N Panay and S Mindoro: it continued to the China Sea and reached the Annam coast
u
t
14-16
November
1899
A small typhoon formed E of Luzon, crossed the island towards the China Sea where it recurved to N and filled up near Balintang Channel
u
t
21-22
November
1899
A distant typhoon moved in the Pacific E of luzon: it probably recurved to NE and later on it approached SE Japan
u
t
1-3
October
1899
A typhoon appeared NE of Manila, movin WNW toward W of Bashi Channel, where it filled up. The barometric minimum on the transport Siam near NE Luzon was 723.7 mm.
u
t
3-8
October
1899
A distant typhoon in the Pacific moved in a WNW direction recurved to N and NE and continued to the SE part of Japan and later to Okhotsk Sea. The barometric minimum on the steamship Columbia near 128.7º E and 23.5º N was 721.4 mm during two days during which the boat was practically carried by the terrific typhoon. The steamship Kelat met the typhoon at about 130.5º E and 31.3º N and its barometer fell to 715.8 mm. It crossed the center of the typhoon and had relative calm during few minutes
i
t
19-20
October
1899
A depression crossed south Visayas
u
s
17-22
September
1899
A typhoon appeared in the Pacific seemingly moving to WNW, and crossed N Luzon, spreading and filling up in the China Sea
u
t
21-22
September
1899
A small typhoon developed in north Sulu Sea
u
t
13-16
August
1899
The typhoon appeared near Loochoos, recurved to NE and crossed Kiushiu and W Hondo towards the Japan Sea; it inclined to ENE and went to the Pacific across the N part of Hondo. The barometric minimum at Kagoshima was 725.6 mm
i
t
15-22
August
1899
The typhoon appeared far away E of Luzon and moving to NW crossed S Formosa and continued westwards to the Continent. The barometric minimum at Koshun was 715.9 mm
i
t
27-29
August
1899
A distant typhoon moved in the Pacific ESE of Oshima towards Kiushiu and crossed this Island and W Hondo, continuing to NE in the Japan Sea
u
t
2-10
July
1899
A typhoon appeared E of Luzon and moved to NW; while E of Batanes it inclined to NNE and passed near Naha and Oshima towards E Kiushiu and later inclined again to NW and passed near E Korea. The barometric minimum at Naha was 727.9 mm, at Oshima 717.2 mm, and at Nagasaki 728.5 mm
i
t
3-4
July
1899
A small but strong typhoon formed W of Negros, crossed N Panay and continued to W or WSW to the China Sea
u
t
13-15
July
1899
A typhoon formed W of Luzon and moved to WNW towards Hainan Strait
u
t
15-26
July
1899
A typhoon appeared NE of Luzon probably when it began to recurve to N and NNE; it neared the E coast of Formosa, passed very near Naha and inclining to NW entered the Continent; it recurved again to ENE, passed S of Shanghai and entered again the Sea; it continued towards S Kiushiu and inclining more to NE, crossed SE Japan and finally went NNE to Okhotsk Sea. The barometric minimum at Naha was 735.8 mm, at Shanghai 736.6 mm, at Tokio 739.0 mm, and at Choshi 733.0 mm
i
t
31-6
July-August
1899
This typhoon appeared E of Luzon very far away moving to NW; it crossed N Formosa and entered the Continent S of Foochow. The barometric minimum at Taichu, Formosa, was 725.1 mm
i
t
8-10
December
1900
On the 8th, a typhoon appeared in the Pacific to the east of the Visayas. After it had traversed the island of Leyte and part of the interisland seas, it seems to have filled up on the 10th, between Luzon and Panay
u
t
13-20
December
1900
A typhoon appeared SE of Guam, advanced in a NW direction to parallel 20º and then recurved to the NE
u
t
13-17
November
1900
One of the most disastrous storms in the memory of the inhabitants of Marianas occurred on November 13th, 1900, and destroyed all crops, fruits and many wooden houses. The United States steamer Yosemite, station ship at Guam, in the early hours of the storm, was driven on the reefs inside Apra Harbor in front of the town of Sumay and severely damaged. During the later shift of the wind, the ship was blown out to sea over the Callan Bank near Spanish Rock, and although the vessel was drawing 40 feet forward the rocks were never touched. Here she lost her remaining anchor. At 4 o'clock the next morning, when the storm subsided, it was seen that the Yosemite was a total derelict; her boats were gone, her rigging torn to pieces, her rudder was gone and the propeller was so badly damaged that it was impossible to make more than 2 knots an hour. After drifting helplessly for 36 hours, the crew were finally taken off the United States steamer Justin, which had weathered the storm in safety. As the Yosemite could not be towed into port, she was sunk after removing all the Goverment property that could be saved. The loss of life in the island amounted to 20, of whom 4 were members of the crew of the Yosemite. Two years after this event the coconut trees in the island were just beginning to recover from the effects of the storm
u
t
1-11
September
1900
It originated between Guam and Western Carolines, crossed Luzon through Nueva Ecija and Tarlac and reached the China coast SW of Canton
u
t


Pedro Ribera, Ricardo García-Herrera, Luis Gimeno and Emiliano Hernández